Torn Between Dimensions

At War With Self - sounds more like a psychological diagnosis than a band! This new group is an instrumental power prog trio leaping onto the progressive scene. The project is the brainchild of guitarist / multi-instrumentalist Glenn Snelwar. Torn Between Dimensions, the band's debut recording, features Snelwar on guitar, mandolin, and keyboards; Michael Manring on fretless bass and e-bow; and Fates Warning's Mark Zonder on drums and percussion.

Zonders solidly tasty drumming firmly anchors the trio along with the melodically propulsive bass work of Manring, all wonderfully adorned by Snelwars fierce playing. The band serves up intense, emotional pieces in a wide variety of musical styles. Snelwars intention is to open doors to listeners who may be unfamiliar with progressive rock, classical guitar or metal. At War With Self have an equal passion for such diverse types of music as progressive and metal bands like King Crimson, Voivod and Pink Floyd; classical composers such as Bartok and Villa Lobos; as well as bluegrass and jazz. Torn Between Dimensions takes these influences and combines them into something undeniably progressive and strikingly original. The end result is a dense wall of sound, with different textures and feels within each number, one song flowing seamlessly into the next.

Guitarist Glenn Snelwar is perhaps best known for his contributions to Gordian Knots eponymous debut, a project led by Chapman Stick player Sean Malone that featured guest performances by Trey Gunn (King Crimson), Sean Reinert (Cynic) & John Myung (Dream Theater). Snelwar helped co-write three of the songs for Gordian Knot, as well as contributing guitar work. Since his involvement with Gordian Knot, Snelwar has been incorporating mandolin, keyboard and string section programming into a foundation of classical, steel string and electric guitar arrangements to great effect.

Michael Manring is a world-renowned, Grammy-nominated bassist who has appeared on over 100 studio projects, including recording and performing with Michael Hedges and Attention Deficit Disorder (with former Primus drummer Tim "Herb" Alexander). Michaels fretless bass parts play a vital role on Torn Between Dimensions, melodic but never overwhelming.

For over 15 years, Mark Zonder occupied the drum stool for progressive metal legends Fates Warning. As Zonders fans would expect, he continues to push new boundaries on Torn Between Dimensions. Marks playing on the disc covers a lot of territory - from double bass drumming and odd time signatures, to jazz and Middle Eastern flavors.

Snelwar describes Torn Between Dimensions as a concept album, but not in the strict sense of the word. I wanted to create a collection of songs where each would stand on its own, but exist as part of a greater whole. I strived to create something that would impact the listener, and incorporate many stylistic influences. Torn Between Dimensions is a tour de force of powerful, fluid prog rock that should appeal to progheads and rock fanatics alike!

Torn Between Dimensions is housed in a digipak and features stunning artwork from noted surrealist Travis Smith.

Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:56
Rate: 
0
This album really reminds me of a less hearty and heady Gordian Knot. I have listened to this numerous times and really wanted to enjoy it, but it's just missing something that I can't put my finger on. It is really sad to because I love the other projects these guys are in.
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:56
Rate: 
0
Drummer Mark Zonder (Fates Warning) and company came out with the strongest of the progressive metal instrumental releases. It doesn't hurt to have Jaco Pastorius protégé Michael Manring on bass and Glen Snelwar on guitars. Glen really brings out the weapons with distorted guitars (low in the mix) and all sorts of acoustic instruments making for some really unique songs. In many ways, the music does have some similarities to the Black Light Syndrome project. For a progressive metal instrumental album, it's pretty light on the metal riffing. If it weren't for the distorted guitar tone, this would qualify as a jazz fusion release.
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Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:56
Rate: 
0
This album really reminds me of a less hearty and heady Gordian Knot. I have listened to this numerous times and really wanted to enjoy it, but it's just missing something that I can't put my finger on. It is really sad to because I love the other projects these guys are in.
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:56
Rate: 
0
Drummer Mark Zonder (Fates Warning) and company came out with the strongest of the progressive metal instrumental releases. It doesn't hurt to have Jaco Pastorius protégé Michael Manring on bass and Glen Snelwar on guitars. Glen really brings out the weapons with distorted guitars (low in the mix) and all sorts of acoustic instruments making for some really unique songs. In many ways, the music does have some similarities to the Black Light Syndrome project. For a progressive metal instrumental album, it's pretty light on the metal riffing. If it weren't for the distorted guitar tone, this would qualify as a jazz fusion release.
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