Transgression

SKU: EANTCD1052
Label:
Esoteric Antenna
Category:
Jazz Rock
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"The Esoteric Antenna label is pleased to announce the release of the new album by internationally acclaimed British saxophone and flute player and composer Theo Travis 'Transgression' his first solo album in eight years, with his band 'Double Talk'. Theo Travis - who has worked with many artists in the Prog, Jazz and Rock worlds such as Gong, Soft Machine Legacy, The Tangent, Bill Nelson, Keith Tippett and with Robert Fripp in Travis & Fripp - has put together a band of progressive jazz stars for the record. Travis is well known for his collaborations with Steven Wilson, appearing on all four of his solo albums as well as recordings with Porcupine Tree and No Man and he has been touring internationally with the Steven Wilson Band from his first solo tour in 2011 up until the current tour. Transgression was recorded in January at Koolworld Studio and Steven Wilson applied his studio skills to the album as he mixed and mastered it in his own studio, just before launching his own 'Hand Cannot Erase' world tour. The album reflects many of Theo's inspirations, being instrumental and powerful bluesy progressive electric jazz with a strong 1970s influence. With influences of King Crimson, Mahavishnu Orchestra as well as late Talk Talk, and ECM artists such as Terje Rypdal and Palle Mikkelborg apparent, TRANSGRESSION is a unique album. The presence of musicians such as Nic France on drums (Steven Wilson's Grace For Drowning album, David Gilmour's Live At The Royal Festival Hall DVD and Kate Bush, Robert Wyatt, Alan Holdsworth, and Working Week), Mike Outram on guitar (Steven Wilson, Herbie Mann, Carleen Anderson, Jacqui Dankworth) and Pete Whittaker on Hammond organ (John Etheridge, Nigel Price, touring member of The Wonder Stuff and Catherine Wheel), ensures that TRANSGRESSION is a milestone in modern Progressive Jazz."

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  • When Worlds Collide is the latest release from Portuguese prog metal band Forgotten Suns.  When the band first burst onto the scene they were very much in the neoprog camp.  Their sound evolved over time with guitarist/founder Ricardo Falcao taking the band into more metallic territory.  With his chops from hell its no wonder.  This is squarely prog metal in the Dream Theater style.  Vocalist Nio Nunes doesn't go for the stratosphere.  He sticks to the midrange and there even some growls in spots.  Apparently keyboardist Ernesto Rodrigues collaborated on the writing.  The results seems to be the band's heaviest work.  While the keyboard work is more than fine the defining sound of the band is guitarist Falcao.  He's the focal point and really delivers the goods.  Forgotten Suns amps up the tried and true prog metal formula and comes up with something quite memorable.  The album runs 79 minutes and is packed with epic length tracks through out.  By the time the album is over you will be exhausted!  Highly recommended.
    $13.00
  • THIS NORTHERN VIRGINIA BASED BAND is a three-piece at heart, musically rooted in the raw energy and rhythmic interplay of RUSH and KING’S X. Fans of dark, guitar-driven rock bands from ALICE IN CHAINS, DEFTONES to the contemporary metal riffing of LAMB OF GOD and PANTERA, will connect to the heavy core of IRIS DIVINE’s sound. Add to that progressive complexity and moody synths inspired by DREAM THEATER and PORCUPINE TREE, and a liberal dose of memorable hooks and melodies, to understand some elements of IRIS DIVINE’s sound. And yet, the band has a distinct identity, not quite sounding like any of the aforementioned bands, and with an emotional urgency that pulls subtly from alternative and other influences.KARMA SOWN IS A TRIUMPH OF A DEBUT ALBUM, immediate and memorable but revealing layers and depth upon repeated listens."Progressive metal is in a rough period right now. The old guard are either releasing sub-standard albums that only make it more obvious how far they have fallen, or they are drastically uncool with anyone who didn't become a fan when progressive metal was first being created. Progressive today tends to mean djent, a style that has sapped all the life and humanity out of music, turning metal into a math equation of time signatures, and not songs that anyone can actually remember. There was a time when progressive metal remembered the ultimate goal of music; to have listeners enjoy the songs so much they would return to them again and again. Today, progressive metal is mostly the sort of music that could pass for muzak, if you don't turn the volume up too loud.Iris Divine wants to change that. They set out with the mission of writing progressive metal that is intricate and challenging, but still produces the kind of songs that listeners who don't have an advanced degree can love and sing along to. It's a challenge, and it goes against the tide, but it's a desperately needed revolution if progressive metal is going to flourish anytime in the near future.I knew from hearing the pre-release track “A Suicide Aware” that Iris Divide was special, and the full album reinforces the point. “The Everlasting Sea” comes out of the gates with plenty of tricky riffing and unusual rhythms, but they lead into big melodies with strong hooks and vocals. Their progressive playing isn't meant for show, it's a tool used to set a tone that juxtaposes with the more melodic moments. Finding the proper balance between these elements is not easy, and many a band have failed miserably trying to do so, but Iris Divine doesn't. On their debut record, they show a skill some bands have spent their entire careers failing to learn.What I love most about the record is that it can be seen in many different lights. If you like straight-ahead metal, there is plenty of heavy riffing and pounding drumming here to keep you satisfied. If you like progressive music, these songs have twists and turns, and Rush-like keyboards, in enough quantity to match the djent crowd. And if you're a fan of old-school radio rock, the choruses in these songs will be music to your ears. Keeping all three of these in mind at the same time can be tricky, but it's worth the effort.For being a trio, “Karma Sown” is a massive sounding record. The production is flawless, big and clear, without ever sounding too polished. The heavy parts are heavy, the vocals are up front, and you would never believe this was a self-produced record that was crowd-funded. I can put it up against many, many of the big label releases, and it would win the fight.In fact, I can think of a dozen so-called progressive metal bands that should immediately hand over their label contracts to Iris Divine, because it's a crime that a band that is advancing progressive metal in the right direction doesn't have the backing of one of the labels. Not to name names, but this album would be bigger than half of the progressive metal released this year if it had the media push behind it.In case you haven't noticed, what I'm saying is that “Karma Sown” is a fantastic debut, and the future of progressive metal. Iris Divine isn't a Dream Theater clone, and they're not djent. What they have done is integrate all the strains of progressive metal into a singular sound, one that could set the standard moving forward. If every band sounded this good, progressive metal wouldn't need to be underground. “Karma Sown” is the best progressive metal album of the year, bar none." - Bloody Good Horror
    $13.00
  • "It’s been five years since their last album, Buried Alone: Tales Of Crushing Defeat, but in that time, the lord of Knifeworld, Kavus Torabi, has been very busy indeed. He’s been part of Gong and various other bands, hosted a prog radio show with snooker legend Steve Davis (who is in fact, more interesting than people might have ever suspected) and of course spent his time working on more Knifeworld material.Since his days with Monsoon Bassoon, Torabi has always been someone who writes dense yet strangely hookladen songs. With Knifeworld things are no different, if anything this album is about as ambitious as anything in Torabi’s long and extensive career to date. The Unravelling is an eight song cycle, is performed as an octet, and is nothing if not grandiose in its intensions. The idea of a song cycle might well sound pretentious, and perhaps it is, but what keeps The Unravelling from unravelling into a unwieldy mess is Torabi’s deft songwriting nous and keen ear for a hook. These songs might well form a cycle, but they are all quite capable of operating independently too.Opening track I Can Teach You How To Lose A Fight starts in muted fashion with delicate keyboards and strummed acoustic guitars complimenting Mel Woods’ beautiful but understated vocals. The whirring of clock parts and machinery in the background give a wonky Victorian feel, but also suggest that the cogs that drive the album are slowly clunking into life. Before long the full band has launched into a freakish prog-hymn, like a kind of feral Rick Wakeman freakout. “Why’d you grow those teeth in your heart?” asks Torabi sounding as if his has been chewed up and spat out by an evil Queen. It’s essentially the dialogue of a relationship winding down, but with its winding musical motifs, joyful honking sax parts mixing with solemn vocals and dramatic guitar stabs, the introduction to the album feels like a kind of synopsis of what’s to follow or an overture of sorts. There’s joy, threat, love, anger, fun and a fair bit of magic too.Send Him Seaworthy starts life as a kind of lurching boy’s own adventure, with nautical themes and a sense of wonder seeping into the orchestration, but come the telling conclusion it becomes tale of paranoid love. Don’t Land On Me meanwhile meanders along in a faintly jazzy way until a sharp stabbing rock riff cuts across its bows. Suddenly, it becomes a curious mix of swing, The Osmonds‘ Crazy Horses and Kenny Rogers‘ version of Condition. The Skulls We Buried Have Regrown Their Eyes meanwhile is a woozy old-school nursery rhyme that contains a requisite amount of grotesque imagery.Destroy The World We Love is the pop nugget around which the album truly revolves. It possesses a laid back lollop, a very deliberate hook with the line “secret in your hands” digging deep into the ears early on, but it quickly reveals itself to be an expansive and exquisite journey. Fans of Genesis (and naturally Cardiacs) will find plenty to appreciate here but as usual Knifeworld stop short of being self-indulgent and ensure that the song never disappears up its own firmament.If The Skulls We Buried hinted at something a little unsettling, then This Empty Room Was Once Alive confirms that there is something genuinely creepy lurking under the surface of this album and it just so happens to be in the form of a Victorian ghost story. Fortunately I’m Hiding Behind My Eyes quickly takes over and steers back towards folk inflected prog before things get to terrifying. Once again, the Octet are in fine form creating a bucolic world for the band to inhabit and explore.The key to this album is in its title. It is well written, and beautifully performed, but in order to get the most out of it, a certain amount of unravelling needs to be done. The five year wait has been worthwhile, and Torabi’s Knifeworld seems ready to begin creating its own universe. As strange and creepy as it seems at first, it is fun to spend time exploring." - MusicOMH 
    $15.00
  • By now everyone knows that Cherry Five was the precursor to Goblin before they signed with Cinevox.  Original drummer Carlo Bordini (of Rustichelli - Bordini fame) and vocalist Tony Tartarini have formed a new version of the band.  Bordini and Tartarini have enlisted Taproban keyboardist Gianluca De Rossi and rounded out the lineup with Ludovico Piccinini (guitar) and Pino Sallusti (bass).So the obvious question is - how is it?  Its a two part answer.  First off its 40 years since the first Cherry Red album was recorded.  This sounds nothing at all like Cherry Red or Goblin.  Tartarini sings in Italian and the music doesn't have the Yes vibe that the original lineup had.  But the second part is actually good news.  The music is a three part conceptual work with epic length tracks.  This fits right into the RPI ("Rock Progressivo Italiano" for those that don't know) vein.  Like his work with the terribly underrated Taproban, De Rossi is the focal point of the band's sound.  Piccinini's guitar tone is a bit modern sounding for the vibe they are trying for but its got a dark energy that fits in well with the keys.  This one's going to be a grower and an easy recommendation.
    $16.00
  • Remastered yet again...Well at least BGO generally does a good job.  This is a two CD set with the band's first two albums.
    $21.00
  • "I know that an album is timeless when, after many years, I return to it and it still sounds fresh. This is what happen to me with ...and so we destroyed everything by Sleepmakeswaves. The instrumental post-rock four-piece band from Sydney is now back with another amazing album, Love Of Cartography, that, starting from the name itself and its fantastic album cover, proves the tendency the band has to map new creative directions within the instrumental rock framework.The new album was recorded in Byron Bay with producer Nick DiDia (Pearl Jam, Stone Temple Pilots, Rage Against The Machine) after fans – and me of course among them - helped to raise over $30,000 through a Pozible campaign. I listened to Love Of Cartography many times before writing about it and, even now, 'Emergent' is playing fulfilling my room with its melody and creating a somber climax.The first thing you'll notice listening to Love Of Cartography is how the Aussie band has moved towards a electro-rock sound that is gonna blow your mind. As masters of meticulous instrumental rock, apocalyptic guitar landscapes, they spoiled us delivering great music, and Love Of Cartography is gloriously no different.Kid, Otto, Alex and Tim, again wonderfully demonstrate their ability to swap pursuing rhythmic sections with soothing ambient segments without losing a step. Love Of Cartography is full of emotional passages that captivate the listener more than the most beautiful mermaids.The journey through the ten tracks of Love Of Cartography starts with 'Perfect Detonator' that launches the listener into the Sleepmakeswaves's space. 'Perfect Detonator' is a complete listening experience, peppered with sonic leitmotifs that fold back onto themselves once the final chords are drowned out by silence. The exploration of this instrumental rock world by the Aussie band continues: ‘Traced in Constellation' flits between glitchy synths and shimmering guitars, whilst the short 'Singularity' unfolds as an interlude and creates a beautiful tension that explodes in the brilliant 'Emergent' that incorporates both post-rocky and electronic elements and suggests that there’s room for the old and the new Sleepmakeswaves's styles to coexist.'Emergent' has a slow-burning introduction but the band doesn't hesitate to proves that they have lost none of their appetite for noise and pursuing rhythm. This track is a journey within a journey; simply awesome.There’s space, too, for the band to expand upon loud-quiet dynamics; 'Great Northern' has a great mix of those segments and listening to it is pure joy. 'The Stars Are Stigmata' is of a bit heavier ride instead that brings us back to the Sleepmakeswaves's style we already adore. This track is as engaging as it is dramatic and the balance between acoustic and electronic elements is a killer.Passing through the soft 'A Little Spark' that invites quiet contemplation, we land onto 'Something Like Avalanches' that is a perfect track with its amazing guitar riffs. The journey through Love Of Cartography ends with the beautiful 'Your Time Will come Again' that blends in it several music genres and the outcome is a beautiful, notable electro-rock ballad. 'Your Time Will come Again' is a credible substitute for nirvana, demanding you to set yourself free from all corporeal existence. Your mind will thank you later.Love Of Cartography ends here but its music won't leave you. The journey is one way." - Echoes And Dust
    $15.00
  • Three Winters in the electronic music trio of Kim Solve, Anders B., and Lars Fredrik Froislie.  The first two musicians may be unknown to you but Lars is of course well known in the prog community from his work with Wobbler and White Willow.  This is rhythmic, darkwave music that has a soundtrack feel.  If you are a fan of Goblin, Zombi, and John Carpenter you'll love this."Last year we published the review of the previous work of Three Winters; “Atrocities” and I gladly received this electro-atmospheric sound of theirs, because it is very interesting and entrancing. Back then I described their sound as: Retro-futuristic, Cinematic Synth-Wave. I have to say that “retro” is because this music made me think about the 80’s, “futuristic” and “cinematic” is because their music could be the perfect score for sci-fi flicks and some Italian horror movies of that era. Three Winters are: Kim Sølve, Anders B., and Lars Fredrik Frøislie; and they are from Oslo, Norway; they have the skills to hook you with these instrumental and well-crafted tunes, and not everybody can do this because a special talent is needed in order to produce melodies outside of the traditional song structures. Their music has atmosphere, and and it can create images in your mind, and at the same time it’s very catchy and dynamic.The first two tracks were featured in the “Atrocities“ EP; they are “Atrocities” and “At The Center Of Dystopia” and I’m glad that they have featured here these tracks because not everybody could own the atrocities EP on tape (at least you still can find it on digital format, and it’s really worth because it features some really interesting and exclusive mixes) “Atrocities” is the perfect music score to hit the highway at night, it could be like the dark side of Kraftwerk’s autobahn or something. “At The Center of Dystopia” has a very detailed musical arrangement, and it was constructed around some industrialized basis created by those non-stop synth chords in the background. “Daybreak Monuments” is eerie and solemn; and “Animism” is so 80’s and cinematic. “A Thousand Piercing Lights” could be a really perfect addition for the soundtrack of some upcoming Silent Hill game, this song is very in the vibe of the work made by Akira Yamaoka; it’s really tasty and dark stuff.“Aeon Surveillance” is very catchy Synth Wave sound. “Harzard” comes with those ominous synth chords over the non-stop (but subtle) machine drum beat; this song has very interesting musical progressions. “Rapture” could be the first single of the album, and they have created a videoclip for it. The ominous synth cords are here again, but this time they are accompanied with robotic voices, and great rhythm, this track is very energetic and powerful; synth Wave sound at its best! “Amnesia” serves the good old sound of those late 70’s-early 80’s Italian horror movies. “Lieke” is majestic keyboards sound at the beginning, the tension is constructed by heavy synth chords, and progressively they lead us to this very fluent and solid Synth Wave sound. “Channel 0” begins with some interference sound, and maybe it could be inspired in the mysterious UV-76 radio signal; and it turns into some meditative and trance inducing tune. It’s the perfect outro for this record.With influences of the progressive-electronic music created by visionaries such as Klaus Shulze, Tangerine Dream, or Goblin, and the early 80’s sounds from Kraftwerk (of course) and Gary Numan; Three Winters have created a stunning debut album with impeccable production. This will expand your musical horizon, leading you to new sounds and new (and very pleasant) musical experiences. This record is highly recommended for those who are interested in the new outbreak of Minimal Wave, and Minimal Synth music." - Gothic Rock
    $16.00
  • Of all the Yes albums that needed a remix this is the one that needed it the most!"Relayer (1974) is the third in a series of remixed and expanded Yes albums.Presented in a mini vinyl replica gatefold card sleeve (with protective inner sleeves) with booklet featuring new sleeve notes by Sid Smith, along with rare photos and archive material, the album has been remixed into stereo and 5.1 Surround Sound from the original studio masters by Steven Wilson and is fully approved by Yes.The blu-ray also contains the original album mix in high-resolution, a complete alternate album running order drawn from demos and studio run-throughs. Additional exclusive Blu-Ray features include extra demo/studio run-throughs, full album instrumental mixes, a full album needle-drop of an original UK A1/B1 vinyl pressing, single edits, live tracks, and needle-drops of the banded tracks from the original US vinyl promo album.Restored artwork approved by Roger Dean, the release of which coincides with the 40th anniversary of the album’s original late 1974 appearance."
    $25.00
  • Third collaboration from Steven Wilson and Aviv Geffen. Mr. Geffen wrote all of the material except for one track. Musically speaking its a very different animal than Porcupine Tree. Its much more laid back with a heavy emphasis on orchestration. I'm reminded a bit of later Pink Floyd and also Roger Water's solo works. Not a lot of pyrotechnics and really not much in the way of heaviness. Its almost as if Mr. Wilson has taken a supporting role as opposed to equal stature to Mr. Geffen. If you are looking for Porcupine Tree's quasi psychedelic metal look elsewhere. Blackfield presents you with (well recorded) art rock that targets your emotions rather than your thought process.
    $20.00
  • Second album from this Italian retro-hard rockers.  Voodoo Highway has been hyped as the second coming of Deep Purple/Led Zeppelin/Thin Lizzy all rolled into one.  While I wouldn't go that far I can say that they do successfully channel the spirit of those bands.  When the Hammond organ kicks in you definitely be transported to California Jam.  They pick up on the Deep Purple/Rainbow vibe and run with it...and they get pretty damn far!  Highly recommended. 
    $15.00
  • Third album from this superb Dutch band.  Laser's Edge has a long standing relationship with the band, having released their debut, Hallway Of Dreams, in North America.Take equal parts Loreena McKennitt, Kate Bush, and Within Temptation and you've got the basic sound of Kingfisher Sky.  The band was formed by ex-Within Temptation drummer Ivar de Graaf and is fronted by his wife Judith Rijnveld.  Judith is an incredible vocalist - her voice will transfix you.  The lineup features two guitarists, cello, keys, bass, and drums.  Everyone in the band is first class but you will always be drawn back to Judith.  The music takes on a mystical, ethereal quality in places.  It never really crosses over into the metal realm but the guitars can get crunchy in a nice way.  One notable guest on this album is Kristeffor Gildenlow who handles all the bass parts.  Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • Third album from a band that is essentially a mash up of members from Sieges Even, Sun Caged and Dreamscape.  Their music carries on very much in the style of the later Sieges Even albums.  In other words progressive rock that leans towards the heavier side of the spectrum.  Rush, Rabin-era Yes, Saga, and Dream Theater come to mind as influences.  Quite melodic and if you are so inclined you'll hear some incredible chops from guitarist Markus Steffen.  The band corraled Stream Of Passion's Marcela Bovio for a guest vocal appearance, dueting with Arno Menses.
    $17.00
  • "This is my favorite album of 2014 so far! I've been a fan of the Swedish solo artist FreddeGredde's proggier compositions since his early YouTube releases, and while his debut album had some great material, there were also many uninteresting tracks that I wouldn't consider prog at all. This has certainly been adjusted with this second album, because what we get is only seven tracks, no fillers, and they are (almost) all very prog, very creative, and just a pleasure to listen to. I can hear similarities with Moon Safari, Frost*, A.C.T, IQ and early Dream Theater, but also classics like Gentle Giant and Genesis, and it all lands in something entirely unique.Songs by song:1. Welcome the Bright Skies A very welcoming opening track for sure! I notice many similarities between FreddeGredde's first album and this second one, and one is the structure and feel of the opening tracks. "Lonely Starlight" on the debut was full-on prog, but was still accessible and had a coherent flow throughout the track, and most of it was in a 13/8 time signature. All the different themes came back together at the end, making a very tight composition. This new opening track has a very similar structure, with a lot of different themes that flow together, mostly in 15/8 this time, and it's all tied together with the majestic "it all comes together" ending. Both albums have very strong openings, and I like them equally but in different ways. My rating: 5 stars2. The Autotelic Self This is the rocker of the album, the most "prog metal" one. But it's still warm and full of synths and layers, separating it from most other modern prog metal, which tends to feel generic and forgettable. But this one is far from that! Clocking in at a little more than 11 minutes, it goes through a wide range of moods and styles, from crazy instrumental sections reminiscent of Images & Words era Dream Theater, to beautiful piano and acoustic guitar breakdowns, to mandolin based "folk" sections. This track has it all, and it all flows extremely well! It might be the highlight track of the album. My rating: 5 stars3. Your Life After two mostly up-beat and intense tracks, this is a welcomed breather. Based on classical guitar and mandolin, it gives a folk/Irish vibe, with almost sing-along qualities, except that there is no repetitive chorus that sticks with you on a first listen. Despite its soft and accessible sound, there's some "prog" to be found here, with 5/4 and 7/4 time signatures and a longer solo section that's alternating between the guitar and the mandolin. The solos are accompanied by an increasingly powerful choir, which creates a pretty powerful climax considering the type of song it is. It's a little odd among the other tracks on the album, but on it's own, it's a pretty little track. My rating: 4 stars4. This Fragile Existence Is the title possibly a reference to "This Falling World" from his previous album? Musically, they have similarities as they both feature large contrasts and breakdowns, and swiftly go through several moods and ideas (maybe more so than usual, even by FreddeGredde's standards). The stand-out features of this track are the complex vocal harmonies, which at times remind me of Queen and other times of Gentle Giant. It's overall a very playful composition, and the adventurous nature of it always manages to make me smile. My rating: 5/5 stars5. The Tower This is the second calmer track of the album, and is more ambient and cinematic than anything he has done before. Starting with only piano and accompanying synth pads, it gives off a cold and wintery vibe, but as the song goes on, it slowly changes back and forth between positive and sad in a very tasteful way. It's prog and it's got the high amount of variation that FreddeGredde is known for, but it's more atmospheric and slower paced. The ending is just extremely beautiful, probably the highlight of the entire album. My rating: 5 stars6. Shining Another shorter song in-between the epics. It's probably the most pop on the album, with a very catchy chorus that you can sing along to even on the first listen. It's got some prog moments though, some interesting time signature changes, and a cute mandolin based bridge. A solid track, but one more for a casual audience rather than the hardcore prog fans. My rating: 3-4 stars7. Ocean Mind And finally, the 18 minute epic. This one is difficult to process, because there is so much going on, and though I love a majority of it, there are some sections that don't grab me entirely. The instrumental sections are the highlights for me, as they are VERY adventurous and crazy, going from jazzy sections to metal to I-can't-even-describe-it. Again, I think the closest resemblance is early Dream Theater. My rating: 4 starsAll in all, definitely warmly recommended to fans of prog!" - ProgArchives
    $14.00
  • "A Sunday Night Above the Rain is a two-disc live set recorded by modern pro giants Marillion last year in March at Center Parcs in Port Zelande, the Netherlands.Disc 1 opens with “Gaza” from the album of the same name. It’s typical Marillion high drama informed by a good chunky beat, spiky middle eastern-sounding synth lines and lilting choruses. Right from the beginning, the crowd comprised of thousands come from over 44 countries this night, is clapping along hot and heavy before Steve Rothery’s wailing guitar solo (one of the most underrated guitar players in rock and roll) and singing along as Steve Hogarth (lead vocalist) will welcome from them often here on the balled “Waiting To Happen,” where, sorry to say, not much really does happen.We get lots of Mark Kelly’s beautiful piano on “This Strange Engine,” though I’m not thrilled by Hogarth’s swallowing words in an over-affected vocal. The tune rocks in its last minutes though as the band and Hogarth rise to an anthem-like ending!The highlight of this first disc though is “Neverland” where Kelly, bassist Peter Trewavas and Hogarth are especially inspired, but again what Steve Rothery slips in are truly spine-chilling moments. What he seemingly just throws away in flips during the vocal are full feasts, his leads perfect from wailing moments to sweet and clean ones, not mere seconds from one another. Not since David Gilmour have I felt a guitarist say so much doing so little.Lots of Disc 2 are from the Gaza album. “Montreal,” with its mid-song Floydian moments, is more a Mark Kelly song really, with especially effective tom work from drummer Ian Mosley behind him and Peter Trewavas poppin’ on the “Power” (good lyric here especially). Mosely and Trewavas are kicking on the opening of what becomes a plinky “The King of Sunset Town,” a tune that showcases a solid Hogarth vocal. A truly beautiful once again piano-led tune, “The Sky Above the Rain” like “Neverland” on the first is the linchpin of this second disc. Hogarth is very good here as are the subtleties of the drum and bass duo once again.The band does give one quick nod to its past (when they were fronted by lead singer/enigmatic frontman Fish) ending with “Garden Party.” Hogarth doesn’t especially sell this tune, but he doesn’t have to as pretty much the audience sings the song for him.If you want to know what modern-day Marillion are all about, grab it." - Short And Sweet NYC
    $15.00