Trouble With Machines

“I love the CD...the sheer skill and gusto with which they tackle it makes you laugh out loud. Great drumming. Jonathan plays and writes like a demon. Congratulations to them.” - Bill Bruford

District 97’s 2010 debut “Hybrid Child” took the progressive rock world by storm. Since then the band toured across the US, performed at a number of high profile festivals, and even opened up for prog icons Kansas. The band now returns with their second opus “Trouble With Machines”. Former American Idol finalist Leslie Hunt fronts District 97. With a fantastic voice and looks to match, she has captured the hearts and imagination of the progressive rock world. Complexity is one of the hallmarks of District 97s compositions but the album is laced with catchy vocal melodies. The track “The Perfect Young Man” features a guest vocal appearance by King Crimson/Asia bassist John Wetton. Rich Mouser who has produced albums for Spock’s Beard and Neal Morse mixed the album. Audiophile mastering comes courtesy of Bob Katz.

Product Review

Wed, 2012-08-01 11:11
Rate: 
0
Amazing release from this band with unpredictable twist in their songs. Should be considered among the best album of 2012. Well done!
You must login or register to post reviews.

Product Review

Wed, 2012-08-01 11:11
Rate: 
0
Amazing release from this band with unpredictable twist in their songs. Should be considered among the best album of 2012. Well done!
You must login or register to post reviews.
Laser Pic

customers also bought

SEE ALL
  • Echoes Of Eternity are an interesting band. The music has quite a bit of intricacy but they are fronted by a bombshell looking singer who's voice tends to float over the technicality. Vocals are melodic and the music actually grooves quite a bit. Good stuff!
    $13.00
  • Third album from Angra vocalist Edu Falaschi's side project. While the first two Almah albums bore quite a bit of similarity to Angra, Motion is a different beast all together. Still very melodic, the music is heavier than Angra. In fact the opening track, "Hypnotic", has an almost industrial feel to it. That doesn't carry through the entire album though. Overall more frenetic than Angra, you won't feel like you were just listening to more of the same.
    $15.00
  • Debut release from this Norwegian progressive ensemble immersed in the 70s sound.  Tusmorke began life as Les Fleurs Du Mal and featured Wobbler vocalist Andreas Prestmo.  They have since gone through changes of lineup and nae.  The band is heavily influenced by Jethro Tull, White Willow and Incredible String Band.  Its flute driven prog with a quirky psychedelic folk element.  The album was produced by Wobbler keyboardist Lars Fredrik Frøislie who contributes his arsenal to the album enhancing the prog vibe.  Mellotron freaks - its all here!  In addition to the album you get 3 bonus tracks of previously unreleased material from Les Fleurs Du Mal.  Highly recommended.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"9132","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"283","width":"400"}}]] 
    $18.00
  • No need to go into a lengthy discussion of this seminal Canterbury band. This is the right way to do a reissue. Universal saw fit to use 24 bit mastering and filled up each disc in the series with extensive bonus material as well as copious liner notes. "If I Could Do It All Over Again" features 4 previously unreleased tracks. Essential.
    $10.00
  • Debut album from this Czech technical death metal band very much influenced by Cynic. As is typical of the genre its a mix of clean and death/thrash vocals. Real tight playing. Not a lot of fresh meat in this genre - this one is quite welcome. "Czech Mindwork is one of those rare bands who seek to channel the later career of Death, and in many ways this debut album mirrors that style of philosphic attunement. I was also reminded in spots of bands such as Spiral Architect, Watchtower and Psychotic Waltz through the band's rather circular, acrobatic riffing tendencies. The title is an apt one, as I found myself further along the record's playtime I became more engrossed in the compositions, which are genuinely riff-tastic, moreso than Death albums like Human or Individual Though Patterns. The band is characterized by their melodic, infectious hooks, busy bass playing and adventurous leads. The vocals can take a little getting used to, they have a filthy thrash tone to them which sounds a little crisp and unpolished in the mix (a little like older Voivod or Deceased), but you'll be paying so much attention to their riffs you will hardly notice. The band is not afraid to traverse a wide distance within a single track, for example "Parasite" is all over the place, part cerebral nightmare and part precision jam session. Other tracks are a little more reigned in, like "Inner Consciousness" and the melodic "Twisted Priorities". You will find very few bands that walk this path in recent years, and Mindwork has a great deal untapped promise even beyond what you hear on this debut. It's all in the name." - From The Dust Returned" blog.
    $13.00
  • So here's my personal confession...after Neal left I felt that Spock's Beard lost their way.  Nick is a fine vocalist but there was something quirky about Neal's writing that had a reverential old school quality that I found lacking.  The albums didn't grab me.  Nick left and Ted Leonard took over on vocals.  Whether it was Enchant or Thought Chamber, he's always stood out and he fits Spock's Beard quite well.  The new drummer Jimmy Keegan slipped into the blend with no dificulty.  The result is (to my mind) a resurgence from this band.  Ryo Okumoto always puts on a show - in particular his heavy reliance on Hammond organ reminds me quite a bit of Steve Walsh.  In fact the sound of the whole album has a Kansas vibe. Coincidentally David Ragsdale guests on one track.  I'm not sure I can remember the last time I said this about a Spock's Beard album - Highly recommended."Very few bands are so recognizable that you know who you are listening to within 2 seconds.  That is all it takes at the beginning of the first track on The Oblivion Particle to know you are listening to Spock’s Beard.  There is no slow buildup or keyboard swells, just straight BAMM!, here we go.  And if the opening notes don’t get you, the organ 5 seconds in will.  The band’s 12th studio album, this one the second with singer Ted Leonard and drummer Jimmy Keegan, is a culmination of years of perfecting a sound and identity, one that not even 2 major lineup changes could fracture. With this new album, Spock’s Beard up their game again and show that this lineup is here to stay.If there was a track that defined what Spock’s Beard are, it might be the opening track, “Tides of Time.”  There are certain checklist items that mark their sound and they are all in this track.  The organ, the harmonies, the acoustic breakdown, the rocking middle and the epic ending.  Each member finds their moments to shine on this one and it provides a jaw-dropping sound overload that could leave one satisfied at that moment; only there is another 60 minutes to go.The album zigs and zags through a few more experimental moments, mixing in some surprises with more traditional Prog elements.  The album’s second track and first single is “Minion”, is a perfect example.  The opening a cappella harmonies provide the sort of memorable chorus and harmonies we’ve come to expect from the group.  While, the following distorted keyboard section is also standard Spock’s Beard.  But the verse and middle of the song is much darker and takes us on a surprising journey.The most unique song the album is the brilliantly titled “Bennett Built a Time Machine”, which the album’s cover is based on.  Drummer Jimmy Keegan takes lead on the vocals here and sounds incredible.  His voice actually fits the track better than Leonard’s probably would have.  The song is one of the album highlights and helps keep the record from sounding redundant.  It is almost a pop song most of the way through until turning on the jets and shifting into Prog mode.There are some heavier moments such as “Hell’s Not Enough” and “Get Out While You Can”. “The Center Line”, however, might be the most similar to something you might have found on their group’s previous album “Brief Nocturnes…”  The track opens with an expansive piano recital piece, before turning into a combo Prog-Western bounce with acoustic guitars carrying the groove. Ted’s voice lifts the choruses flawlessly and creates an almost cinematic soundscape.Even with all of these great moments, it is the album’s closing track that is the best song on the album.  “Disappear” might be one of the best songs the band has recorded since Neal left the group.  “We could disappear, you and me, we could be, anyplace else not here” sings Ted in the chorus as he wonders what might be if we left with no one knowing what happened.  The song is really the closest thing to a ballad on the album, but it doesn’t stay that way for long.  2 minutes in, the song stirs into a frenzy just before a brief cameo by Kansas’ David Ragsdale, appearing with his violin.  Of course, the big epic orchestral ending takes us home as Alan Morse provides the finishing touches with his unique finger picking soloing excellence.Spock’s Beard are Prog rock’s most reliable unit.  They have yet to disappoint and always provide comfort to their faithful fans with music that is both inspiring and breathtaking.  And while The Oblivion Particle shows a harder edged Spock’s Beard, it also displays a group that shows no signs of slowing down and is ready to take on all comers." - The Prog Report 
    $12.00
  • 30th Anniversary remastered edition.
    $15.00
  • Here's a new band that will give avant prog fans a screaming orgasm.  Rhun are a French ensemble.  Their music quite effectively captures the essence of Magma, RIO, and Canterbury.  That's just the first song!!  "The musicians offer an interesting and vivid mosaic of predominantly Canterbury, Zeuhl, Jazz, RIO, and (Kraut)Rock. Beside two guitars, bass, drum, percussion and thrown in sounds, two horn players bring lively colors on sax, bassoon, clarinet and flute in this complex mix. The two singers act in a more avant-garde way as for example Magma. People interested in above mentioned styles should have fun." 
    $18.00
  • US prog band's classic third album remastered. Comes with two bonus tracks - demos of "Child Of Innocence" and "It's You".
    $5.00
  • Peculiar but interesting band from Belgium. Oceans Of Sadness mix progressive, death and doom metal influences freely and even incorporate some 70s flavors as well. The music is a bit off-kilter in the same way that Pain Of Salvation used to be. Vocals are a mix of clean and coarse. The odd use of Hammond organ in places is a weird stylistic choice that just helps to set these guys apart from the norm. If you like your prog metal to the left of center check these guys out.
    $8.00
  • Apparently its been 9 years since the last Ring Of Fire album.  Time flies...Ring Of Fire consists of keyboardist Vitalij Kuprij, guitarist Tony MacAlpine, and vocalist Mark Boals.  For Battle Of Leningrad the band is filled out with Timmo Tolkki on bass, and Jani Huovinen on drums.  Tolkki also produces.No surprises here - the band follows the muse of Kuprij, which is neoclassical metal with a strong sense of melody.  Compositionally you can hear the influences of the great Russian composers - Mussorgsky, Rachmaninoff,  and Tchaikovsky but also Beethoven and Bach.  Kuprij's keys are very prominent.  Lots of symphonic elements but as we all know he is an extraordinary pianist and he shows his skills off to great extent.  You can't keep a good man down - MacAlpine offers lots of blitzkrieg soloing.  At this point Boals is so engrained into this style of music that you almost take him for granted.  Dating back to Malmsteen, Artension and their ilk, I've always been a sucker for this genre when its well done.  Ring Of Fire do it about as well as it can be done.  Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • "A superb slice of the swinging seventies as seen through the eyes of one contender to the throne... Rod St James. Originally released on the small budget label Paula in 1972, this obscure psych/soul/folk rock album is a superb example of years gone by and lost in aging summer sands with flairs and sunglasses to match. Very little is known about Rod... information is thin on the ground but those who have heard this album always rate it extremely high. Contains some great heavy guitar work (wailing fuzz and wha-wha), funky percussion, trippy organ, with laid-back cool-phased hippie vocals. The second half of the album showcasing a more 'folky' feel. One of the more mainstream sounding albums to be released on Radioactive, but if you're after a sound that sums up an era... this is the album. Think Donovan meets James Taylor meets Paul Williams."
    $2.00
  • "There was alot riding on this album. After the general economical failure of their first two albums released in the States, Humble Pie and Rock On, their live albums, Rockin’ the Filmore shot them up to top-billing across the country and into a major name. So, when Smokin’ hit the racks it would provide exposure of the studio side to a band that became famous on their live side. The reception would be significant.Steve Marriott, Humble Pie’s lead singer and guitarist, described the album to me as one that was quite fun to make, and enthusiastically performed. Well, boys and girls, I don’t know quite how much fun it was to make, but I sure as hell can say that the record is pretty damn enthusiastic.Actually there is nothing extremely original about the band. They play a brand of rock ‘n roll that is definitely not unique to them. So…just what is it about Humble Pie, or for that matter Smokin’ that in actuality puts them in a class above so many others? That is the question I had to set out to answer with this review.And to be truthful I wasn’t quire sure about that answer when I started writing this thing ten minutes ago. But now, with “C’mon Everybody” rockin’ in the background, the answer has become apparent.Humble Pie is a confident band. They don’t bashfully kick around a number of styles and techniques. When they set out to record a number, they do it. And do it with gusto.“Hot ‘N’ Nasty” debuts the LP, with the help of Steve Stills on harmonies, in a straight-ahead, no compromise style of rock that just can’t miss.Marriott’s vocal style can be reminiscent at times of early Jagger, yes, but the initial Jagger vocal steadfastness is missing. But this isn’t any sound-alike contest, so as Eddie Haskell says “Who give a heck, Sam.”“You’re So Good to Me” is a pretty song that Marriott is especially fond of, even though he has yet to work it into his stage act. The acoustic nature of the tune, sets it a small distance from the other material, but don’t get the wrong impression. It is by no means a Steve Marriott as James Taylor item. Humble Pie a it’s mellowest is a major bit nastier than the nastiest of Taylor’s tunes.“30 Days in the Hole” makes good use of chorus as somewhat of a restraint on Marriott’s lyrical work. As soon as he begins to stray a bit from the main theme, Jerry Shirley, Greg Ridley and Clem Clempson vocally remind him of the song’s title.All this is leading up to, of course, the showcase of the LP. The ultimate in balls rock. The quintessence of rock ‘n roll. The epitomy of shake yer ass music – “C’mon Everybody,” an Eddie Cochran tune. A killer song if I ever heard one. Great guitar work.Marriott and the band are especially proud of this LP. First, it is doing fantastically well in the States. And second, Smokin’ was the band’s first production on their own. Also, Clempson is a new member, doing just an excellent job on guitar on keyboards.Humble Pie is a band that works with the bare essentials of rock ‘n roll. Performance Rockin’ the Fillmore proved them as a great live band. Smokin’ proves them as a great band. Anywhere." - Cameron Crowe/The Uncool
    $5.00
  • Snapper edition of the classic album from 1973.
    $12.00