Trouble With Machines

“I love the CD...the sheer skill and gusto with which they tackle it makes you laugh out loud. Great drumming. Jonathan plays and writes like a demon. Congratulations to them.” - Bill Bruford

District 97’s 2010 debut “Hybrid Child” took the progressive rock world by storm. Since then the band toured across the US, performed at a number of high profile festivals, and even opened up for prog icons Kansas. The band now returns with their second opus “Trouble With Machines”. Former American Idol finalist Leslie Hunt fronts District 97. With a fantastic voice and looks to match, she has captured the hearts and imagination of the progressive rock world. Complexity is one of the hallmarks of District 97s compositions but the album is laced with catchy vocal melodies. The track “The Perfect Young Man” features a guest vocal appearance by King Crimson/Asia bassist John Wetton. Rich Mouser who has produced albums for Spock’s Beard and Neal Morse mixed the album. Audiophile mastering comes courtesy of Bob Katz.

Product Review

Wed, 2012-08-01 11:11
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Amazing release from this band with unpredictable twist in their songs. Should be considered among the best album of 2012. Well done!
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Product Review

Wed, 2012-08-01 11:11
Rate: 
0
Amazing release from this band with unpredictable twist in their songs. Should be considered among the best album of 2012. Well done!
You must login or register to post reviews.
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