Un Minuto

Un Minuto

BY PFM (Premiata Forneria Marconi)

(Customer Reviews)
$19.00
$ 11.40
SKU: ARS IMM 1029
Label:
Immaginifica
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Recorded during the band's live performance residency in Tokyo, this is a complete rendition of the first album, Storia Di Un Minuto.

"To celebrate the 40 years anniversary of "L'isola di niente", PFM have recorded an incredible series of live albums, where they play the original first 5 LPs tracklist in its entirety for the first time ever. This energetic new version it is called "Un minuto" features the first historic LP "Storia di un minuto" with all its fantastic tracks including, for the first time, "Grazie davvero", never played live before.

Released in CD papersleeve, "Un minuto" is part of a series which includes the first PFM's five albums reproduced live, to be collected in an elegant box called "Il suono del tempo"."

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