We Are The Others (Special Edition)

Fronted by the fiery-tressed Charlotte Wessels, Delain is the brainchild of ex-Within Temptation keyboardist, Martijn Westerholt. Originally conceived by Westerholt as an all-star studio project, the success of the debut album Lucidity tipped his hand and Delain evolved into a full blown band. The immediate impact of their debut “Lucidity”, put Delain on tour. An instant live hit, the band’s popularity continued to grow with the release of their 2nd album “April Rain”. The band found themselves on tour through out Europe, USA, Mexico, and Brazil. Highlights of the tour included festival performances at Wacken Open Air, Sonisphere, Lowlands, ProgPower USA, and Hellfest. As the band’s popularity grew they evolved from a support act for Kamelot and Epica into full fledged headliners across Europe.

“We Are The Others” is the band’s third album. It was produced by the team of Jacob Hellner (Rammstein, Apocalyptica), Fredrik Thomander and Anders Wikstrom (Scorpions, Backyard Babies). At first glance some song titles on “We Are The Others” may sound mysterious and conspiratorial, but there is a very serious background: The lyrics to the title-track were inspired by the hate-crime against a British girl named Sophie Lancaster in 2007. She and her boyfriend were beaten comatose by a gang of youths, because of their goth looks. Sophie died from her injuries. This tragedy sent shock waves throughout the world. Delain’s response to this tragic case is expressed through the song We Are The Others.

The band met Fear Factory’s Burton C. Bell at Wacken Open Air. As a result he guests on the track “Where Is The Blood”. The Sensory special digipak edition features four bonus tracks. The steampunk influenced cover art was created by noted pop surrealist Glenn Arthur.

Product Review

Wed, 2012-06-27 15:42
Rate: 
0
“We Are The Others” is the long-anticipated new album from Dutch symphonic metal band Delain. Originally slated for release last spring, a shake up at the band’s label, Roadrunner Records, caused the album to be delayed with no information on when it would be released. Through the power of social media, Delain’s hardcore fans created a Facebook petition page for Roadrunner to release the album. Eventually, the label relented and ‘We Are The Others” has been released (it will be available through Sensory in the U.S. on July 3rd). Well after several spins, I can tell you that WATO was worth the wait! The trademark Delain melodic metal sound is still there although the symphonic elements have diminished slightly and new influences have been added to the mix. Lead vocalist Charlotte Wessels sounds more confident and is in fine voice on the albums twelve tracks. The guitars have been downtuned and have more of an “Evergrey” crunch to them. The first song “Mother Machine” has an industrial/steampunk intro and a heavy guitar riff kicks in. Charlotte’s sultry vocal sings about living in a cold and heartless world with the anology of a steelworker factory. The lyrics fit the song perfectly and the breakdown at the end of the song is arguably the heaviest thing that Delain has ever recorded. “Electricity” has a great mid-tempo trademark Delain chorus and keyboardist Martijn Westerholt’s trademark ivory tinkling adds the melody. The lyrics to the title track were inspired by the brutal death of British teen Sophie Lancaster, who was beaten to death simply for having a “goth” look. Knowing the meaning behind the lyrics makes the song all the more powerful when Wessels sings the first line; “I’m walking with Sophie tonight. She lives in the air that I breathe. I can’t get it out of my mind, how you were left to bleed.” It’s a great outsiders anthem and the lyrics gave me goosebumps. “Milk and Honey” has a sexy sensual vibe with industrial overtones but still maintains the Delain sound. On “Hit Me With Your Best Shot” (no, not the Pat Benatar song), Charlotte’s pop sensibilities take the center stage as she further distances herself from her symphonic metal peers. The album slows down with “I Want You”, a dark and twisted tale of love and obsession. For fans of the symphonic style it’s the closest Delain come to the genre that they get placed into. Fear Factory main man Burton C. Bell adds his distinctive vocals to the rockin’ “Where’s The Blood?” While not having the same effect as past collaborations with Tarot/Nightwish’s Marco Hietala, Bell and Wessels voices blend well together. Delan take on the subject of today’s “Twitter/Facebook” obsessed society on “ the up-tempo Generation Me”. “Babylon” is an epic metal song in the Delain tradition. The pop sound returns on “Are You Done With Me?”, which has a catchy sing-a-long refrain. The beginning notes of “Get The Devil Out of Me” bring to mind the title track to Delain’s last album “April Rain”, but soon enough it distinguishes itself with an infectious chorus. Otto Schimmelpenninck van der Oije makes his presence known with a thumping bass line on album closer “Not Enough” which is an appropriately titled way to end the album. The special edition digipak contains four live tracks including “The Gathering” and “Control the Storm” featuring Marco Hietala. Having been lucky enough to see these duets performed live at ProgPower XI in Atlanta in 2010, I can say they have more of a powerful punch in a live setting. Also included is the live show staples ‘Shattered” and “Sleepwalkers Dream”. With “We Are The Others” Delain has created their finest achievement. It’s high time that the band gets recognized as a major force in melodic metal and Charlotte Wessels proves she belongs at the top of her class of vocalist peers. Perhaps it’s time for Delain to finally return to this side of the pond to conquer the U.S. concert stages. Rating: 10 “We Are The Others” is the long-anticipated new album from Dutch symphonic metal band Delain. Originally slated for release last spring, a shake up at the band’s label, Roadrunner Records, caused the album to be delayed with no information on when it would be released. Through the power of social media, Delain’s hardcore fans created a Facebook petition page for Roadrunner to release the album. Eventually, the label relented and ‘We Are The Others” has been released (it will be available through Sensory in the U.S. on July 3rd). Well after several spins, I can tell you that WATO was worth the wait! The trademark Delain melodic metal sound is still there although the symphonic elements have diminished slightly and new influences have been added to the mix. Lead vocalist Charlotte Wessels sounds more confident and is in fine voice on the albums twelve tracks. The guitars have been downtuned and have more of an “Evergrey” crunch to them. The first song “Mother Machine” has an industrial/steampunk intro and a heavy guitar riff kicks in. Charlotte’s sultry vocal sings about living in a cold and heartless world with the anology of a steelworker factory. The lyrics fit the song perfectly and the breakdown at the end of the song is arguably the heaviest thing that Delain has ever recorded. “Electricity” has a great mid-tempo trademark Delain chorus and keyboardist Martijn Westerholt’s trademark ivory tinkling adds the melody. The lyrics to the title track were inspired by the brutal death of British teen Sophie Lancaster, who was beaten to death simply for having a “goth” look. Knowing the meaning behind the lyrics makes the song all the more powerful when Wessels sings the first line; “I’m walking with Sophie tonight. She lives in the air that I breathe. I can’t get it out of my mind, how you were left to bleed.” It’s a great outsiders anthem and the lyrics gave me goosebumps. “Milk and Honey” has a sexy sensual vibe with industrial overtones but still maintains the Delain sound. On “Hit Me With Your Best Shot” (no, not the Pat Benatar song), Charlotte’s pop sensibilities take the center stage as she further distances herself from her symphonic metal peers. The album slows down with “I Want You”, a dark and twisted tale of love and obsession. For fans of the symphonic style it’s the closest Delain come to the genre that they get placed into. Fear Factory main man Burton C. Bell adds his distinctive vocals to the rockin’ “Where’s The Blood?” While not having the same effect as past collaborations with Tarot/Nightwish’s Marco Hietala, Bell and Wessels voices blend well together. Delan take on the subject of today’s “Twitter/Facebook” obsessed society on “ the up-tempo Generation Me”. “Babylon” is an epic metal song in the Delain tradition. The pop sound returns on “Are You Done With Me?”, which has a catchy sing-a-long refrain. The beginning notes of “Get The Devil Out of Me” bring to mind the title track to Delain’s last album “April Rain”, but soon enough it distinguishes itself with an infectious chorus. Otto Schimmelpenninck van der Oije makes his presence known with a thumping bass line on album closer “Not Enough” which is an appropriately titled way to end the album. The special edition digipak contains four live tracks including “The Gathering” and “Control the Storm” featuring Marco Hietala. Having been lucky enough to see these duets performed live at ProgPower XI in Atlanta in 2010, I can say they have more of a powerful punch in a live setting. Also included is the live show staples ‘Shattered” and “Sleepwalkers Dream”. With “We Are The Others” Delain has created their finest achievement. It’s high time that the band gets recognized as a major force in melodic metal and Charlotte Wessels proves she belongs at the top of her class of vocalist peers. Perhaps it’s time for Delain to finally return to this side of the pond to conquer the U.S. concert stages.
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Product Review

Wed, 2012-06-27 15:42
Rate: 
0
“We Are The Others” is the long-anticipated new album from Dutch symphonic metal band Delain. Originally slated for release last spring, a shake up at the band’s label, Roadrunner Records, caused the album to be delayed with no information on when it would be released. Through the power of social media, Delain’s hardcore fans created a Facebook petition page for Roadrunner to release the album. Eventually, the label relented and ‘We Are The Others” has been released (it will be available through Sensory in the U.S. on July 3rd). Well after several spins, I can tell you that WATO was worth the wait! The trademark Delain melodic metal sound is still there although the symphonic elements have diminished slightly and new influences have been added to the mix. Lead vocalist Charlotte Wessels sounds more confident and is in fine voice on the albums twelve tracks. The guitars have been downtuned and have more of an “Evergrey” crunch to them. The first song “Mother Machine” has an industrial/steampunk intro and a heavy guitar riff kicks in. Charlotte’s sultry vocal sings about living in a cold and heartless world with the anology of a steelworker factory. The lyrics fit the song perfectly and the breakdown at the end of the song is arguably the heaviest thing that Delain has ever recorded. “Electricity” has a great mid-tempo trademark Delain chorus and keyboardist Martijn Westerholt’s trademark ivory tinkling adds the melody. The lyrics to the title track were inspired by the brutal death of British teen Sophie Lancaster, who was beaten to death simply for having a “goth” look. Knowing the meaning behind the lyrics makes the song all the more powerful when Wessels sings the first line; “I’m walking with Sophie tonight. She lives in the air that I breathe. I can’t get it out of my mind, how you were left to bleed.” It’s a great outsiders anthem and the lyrics gave me goosebumps. “Milk and Honey” has a sexy sensual vibe with industrial overtones but still maintains the Delain sound. On “Hit Me With Your Best Shot” (no, not the Pat Benatar song), Charlotte’s pop sensibilities take the center stage as she further distances herself from her symphonic metal peers. The album slows down with “I Want You”, a dark and twisted tale of love and obsession. For fans of the symphonic style it’s the closest Delain come to the genre that they get placed into. Fear Factory main man Burton C. Bell adds his distinctive vocals to the rockin’ “Where’s The Blood?” While not having the same effect as past collaborations with Tarot/Nightwish’s Marco Hietala, Bell and Wessels voices blend well together. Delan take on the subject of today’s “Twitter/Facebook” obsessed society on “ the up-tempo Generation Me”. “Babylon” is an epic metal song in the Delain tradition. The pop sound returns on “Are You Done With Me?”, which has a catchy sing-a-long refrain. The beginning notes of “Get The Devil Out of Me” bring to mind the title track to Delain’s last album “April Rain”, but soon enough it distinguishes itself with an infectious chorus. Otto Schimmelpenninck van der Oije makes his presence known with a thumping bass line on album closer “Not Enough” which is an appropriately titled way to end the album. The special edition digipak contains four live tracks including “The Gathering” and “Control the Storm” featuring Marco Hietala. Having been lucky enough to see these duets performed live at ProgPower XI in Atlanta in 2010, I can say they have more of a powerful punch in a live setting. Also included is the live show staples ‘Shattered” and “Sleepwalkers Dream”. With “We Are The Others” Delain has created their finest achievement. It’s high time that the band gets recognized as a major force in melodic metal and Charlotte Wessels proves she belongs at the top of her class of vocalist peers. Perhaps it’s time for Delain to finally return to this side of the pond to conquer the U.S. concert stages. Rating: 10 “We Are The Others” is the long-anticipated new album from Dutch symphonic metal band Delain. Originally slated for release last spring, a shake up at the band’s label, Roadrunner Records, caused the album to be delayed with no information on when it would be released. Through the power of social media, Delain’s hardcore fans created a Facebook petition page for Roadrunner to release the album. Eventually, the label relented and ‘We Are The Others” has been released (it will be available through Sensory in the U.S. on July 3rd). Well after several spins, I can tell you that WATO was worth the wait! The trademark Delain melodic metal sound is still there although the symphonic elements have diminished slightly and new influences have been added to the mix. Lead vocalist Charlotte Wessels sounds more confident and is in fine voice on the albums twelve tracks. The guitars have been downtuned and have more of an “Evergrey” crunch to them. The first song “Mother Machine” has an industrial/steampunk intro and a heavy guitar riff kicks in. Charlotte’s sultry vocal sings about living in a cold and heartless world with the anology of a steelworker factory. The lyrics fit the song perfectly and the breakdown at the end of the song is arguably the heaviest thing that Delain has ever recorded. “Electricity” has a great mid-tempo trademark Delain chorus and keyboardist Martijn Westerholt’s trademark ivory tinkling adds the melody. The lyrics to the title track were inspired by the brutal death of British teen Sophie Lancaster, who was beaten to death simply for having a “goth” look. Knowing the meaning behind the lyrics makes the song all the more powerful when Wessels sings the first line; “I’m walking with Sophie tonight. She lives in the air that I breathe. I can’t get it out of my mind, how you were left to bleed.” It’s a great outsiders anthem and the lyrics gave me goosebumps. “Milk and Honey” has a sexy sensual vibe with industrial overtones but still maintains the Delain sound. On “Hit Me With Your Best Shot” (no, not the Pat Benatar song), Charlotte’s pop sensibilities take the center stage as she further distances herself from her symphonic metal peers. The album slows down with “I Want You”, a dark and twisted tale of love and obsession. For fans of the symphonic style it’s the closest Delain come to the genre that they get placed into. Fear Factory main man Burton C. Bell adds his distinctive vocals to the rockin’ “Where’s The Blood?” While not having the same effect as past collaborations with Tarot/Nightwish’s Marco Hietala, Bell and Wessels voices blend well together. Delan take on the subject of today’s “Twitter/Facebook” obsessed society on “ the up-tempo Generation Me”. “Babylon” is an epic metal song in the Delain tradition. The pop sound returns on “Are You Done With Me?”, which has a catchy sing-a-long refrain. The beginning notes of “Get The Devil Out of Me” bring to mind the title track to Delain’s last album “April Rain”, but soon enough it distinguishes itself with an infectious chorus. Otto Schimmelpenninck van der Oije makes his presence known with a thumping bass line on album closer “Not Enough” which is an appropriately titled way to end the album. The special edition digipak contains four live tracks including “The Gathering” and “Control the Storm” featuring Marco Hietala. Having been lucky enough to see these duets performed live at ProgPower XI in Atlanta in 2010, I can say they have more of a powerful punch in a live setting. Also included is the live show staples ‘Shattered” and “Sleepwalkers Dream”. With “We Are The Others” Delain has created their finest achievement. It’s high time that the band gets recognized as a major force in melodic metal and Charlotte Wessels proves she belongs at the top of her class of vocalist peers. Perhaps it’s time for Delain to finally return to this side of the pond to conquer the U.S. concert stages.
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Without a doubt, Love, Fear and the Time Machine features some of the most gorgeous, tragic, and ultimately inspiring pieces Riverside have ever recorded, making it another exceptional entry in an invaluable catalog.According to Duda, the effort is a return to the softer, more ambient nature of Riverside’s debut, 2004’s Out of Myself. In fact, the foursome intentionally composed it “to combine the ‘70s and the ‘80s…[the songs] have never been so concise and to the point before.” Because of this new approach, the disc actually evokes Duda’s other project, Lunatic Soul, in subtle but substantial ways at times. Like almost all of Riverside’s previous works, Love, Fear and the Time Machine is also a conceptual record; specifically, it “talk[s] about transformation. About making an important, perhaps life-changing decision everyone has to make at some point in their lives…on the one hand, we’re excited by the change…[but] on the other, we fear the unknown.” Ultimately, the lesson to be learned from it is that “if we sometimes get lost in life, it is to go through something and be found again on the other side, to be reborn as someone better and more valuable.”Fittingly, then, the sequence starts with “Lost (Why Should I Be Frightened by a Hat?)”, which is arguably its best track. Duda begins by reciting a philosophical recollection over a delicate ether of keyboards and bass and guitar notes. Afterward, he launches into a catchy and charming chorus: “Come follow me / We’ll go down / Where the river flows / One day / Just you and I will find a bridge / To another land”. Duda layers his voices too, making it even more gripping, and in-between his passages, guitarist Piotr Grudziński issues his signature soaring accompaniment as the composition evolves. Drummer Piotr Kozieradzki keeps things steady throughout, while keyboardist Michał Łapaj gets the spotlight during the final seconds. Ultimately, “Lost” exemplifies the magnificent succinctness that makes Love, Fear and the Time Machine distinctive in the Riverside canon.Later on, “#Addicted” truly feels like a progressive rock take on the Cure in several ways, such as its dominant bass lines, starry guitar lines, and wistful singing which finds Duda channeling a silky falsetto he’s never really attempted before. There’s also a brief acoustic guitar arpeggio at the end that’s very enjoyable. Lyrically, it serves as a commentary on how social media can transform people into egocentric users who base their self-worth on their digital populiarty. In this way, both its lyrics and music find Riverside stretching slightly beyond its comfort zone, but the result is undeniably, well, addictive.“Caterpillar and the Barbed Wire” feels more traditional, with Duda’s sorrowful confessions and counterpoints perfectly complemented by sharp guitar riffs, aching solos, enveloping percussion, and a moving layer of synthesized splendor. Honestly, it’s like a heartbreaking and somewhat more colorful missing track from Shine of New Generation Slaves, whereas “Saturate Me” contains the sleek yet eccentric tones and virtuosic yet blunt balance that made up the best moments on Rapid Eye Movement. Of course, its sad ponderings, such as “Am I Invisible? / Or alive? / I don’t want to feel like I’m no one anymore”, are archetypal Riverside sentiments, and the interlocking musical patterns (especially near the end) are equally touching.The most commercial segment on Love, Fear and the Time Machine is surely “Discard Your Fear”; however, despite that typically negative connotation, the song’s approachability doesn’t get in the way of its worth. Rather, it’s uplifting message and relatively simple and familiar construction could earn Riverside an entirely new camp of fans. It’s actually quite cathartic, as is the dreamy and tasteful “Toward the Blue Horizon”, which begins and ends as a luscious ode (with lovely piano chords) while transforming into a progressive metal workout in the middle.Both of the record’s final two pieces—“Time Travellers” and “Found (The Unexpected Flaw of Searching)”—are wonderful. The former is an exquisite acoustic ballad about past possibilities and the unforeseen future. Its winding melodies and spaciousness are the standout features, as the rest of the band lets Duda’s voice lead the way, resulting in a simple but commanding experience. In contrast, the latter is more elaborate, impactful, and conclusive, with a strong sense of closure and acceptance, as the speaker realizes the importance of his or her experiences, uncertainties, and decisions. The music builds with great pacing, adding more beautiful layers as the chorus (“It’s a lovely life / You have gone so far / Don’t give it up / Oh, it’s a lovely life / Gotta go with what you think is right”) repeats with sleek harmonies. By the end, listeners are left in awe, reevaluating their own sense of purpose and optimism.Love, Fear and the Time Machine is likely the most polarizing record Riverside has made, as it could be considered both the band’s strongest and weakest full-length effort. Fans hoping for virtuosic jams and unexpected sounds won’t really find them here, while fans looking for more of Riverside’s token elegant instrumentation, affective melodies, and poetic, rich singing will be satisfied beyond measure. Either way, Love, Fear and the Time Machine definitely finds its creators reaching for new, if marginally different, heights, which is commendable in and of itself. Roughly ten years on, Riverside remains as special as ever, and Love, Fear and the Time Machine is, in several ways, its truest work of art." - Pop Matters
    $22.00
  • "Riot has always been ahead of the curve, be it their powerful riff machine, or their unapologetic status as pioneers in the speed metal genre. I would like to take an opportunity to differ once again with the common viewpoint here, this is not “almost” Painkiller 2 years before; it is its doppelganger, at least in terms of kick ass aggressiveness and image. It is a more musical and complex answer to the thrash genre that it fathered; its spirit is that of a triumphant warrior cutting down its foes. While the heroic Painkiller soared through the sky putting fear into the hearts of his enemies, Thundersteel’s half-cyborg/half-tank body stood tall to face them on the ground.In 1988 metal was mostly known by its image, and if you judge these guys by that alone, they look like the bastard sons of Motley Crue and Judas Priest. But when Tony Moore blasts his high banshee voice into the microphone, he sounds like a crazed Viking Berserker ready to behead an army of frightened Romans. Mark Reale, the only remaining originator of this outfit, wields his guitar like a battle axe and challenges the likes of K.K. Downing, Dave Murray and Ross the Boss. Bobby Jarzombek, who is well known for his work with Rob Halford’s solo project, as well as several other bands, gives the performance of his life on here. Don Van Stavern keeps the bottom end solid and has a wicked bass intro in “Johnny’s Back”.There is never a dull moment on this album, from start to finish it grabs you by the throat and commands you to praise the Gods of Metal. Be it the fast as hell title track, which rivals anything Judas Priest has ever put out, or the more moderated Deep Purple riff monster “Sign of the Crimson Storm”, it screams metal. You’ve got an anthem of rebellion and non-conformity at warp speed like “Johnny’s Back” in the running, or the Manowar inspired heavy ballad “Bloodstreets”, which gives Heart of Steel a run for its money. “Fight or Fall” and “Flight of the Warrior” have memorable choruses and plenty of amazing lead work, all done by the original speed metal riff man Mark Reale, while “On Wings of Eagles” is a better produced version of something you might find on Kill Em’ All.We’ve got two highlights on this album, both of which are a good bit different than the lion’s share of speed driven songs on here. “Run for your life” is an upper mid-tempo crusher with tons of great lead guitar work, but it’s true charm is the chorus, which reminds me a bit of the high/low vocal interchanges that you hear on Dio’s early material. “Buried Alive (The Tell Tale Heart)” is actually a bit reminiscent of Crimson Glory’s work on Transcendence, which came out the same year that this did. You’ve got a rather odd spoken intro with a clean and somber guitar line, followed by some brilliant twin guitar soloing (all done by one guy, just the same way Tony Iommi did it). After 3 minutes of mind-blowing, we get a slow and evil sounding groove that grows into a brilliant homage to the NWOBHM, names like Iron Maiden and Angel Witch come to mind.In conclusion, this is a piece of metal history that demands to be listened to. If you are a power metal fan who lives for speed and melody, get your tight jeans wearing ass to the store right now. If you’re a holdover from the glory days of traditional metal and you don’t have it, get it now or risk having your credentials as a metal head questioned. If you love thrash with attitude, this gives the bands that carry that label a run for their money. Fans of Judas Priest, Manowar, Helloween, Running Wild, and Iron Maiden in particular will love this. There is a new power alive in the distance, carrying a fully charged plasma cannon, followed by an army of true metal warriors, and his name is “Thundersteel”." - Metal Archives
    $7.00
  • "After several years' absence with members going off in their own various directions, Echolyn returned with a new offering. Cowboy Poems Free shows a decidedly more straightforward sound than their earlier days, while retaining the layered harmonies and often intricate phrasing for which the band is known. In many ways, this album strikes me as a worthy modern-day successor to The Band's work, a promenade of the American mythos part past and present, an examination that seems at once both of a particular time and universal. "Texas Dust" is a powerhouse of an opener. Brett Kull's plaintive, everyman voice is the perfect harness for this tale of live-by-the-day Texas farmers trying to eke out a living while at the mercy of nature. From the forceful, offbeat main riff that drives the tune, to Kull's final awe-engulfed cry "the wind came on," this is my favorite track of the album. Ray Weston, now taking over bass duties for the band, provides vocals ranging from the Prohibition-defying, hedonistic "Swingin' the Ax" to the loneliness of "1729 Broadway" (if I recall correctly, the lyrics to this one are adapted from an actual letter of an ancestor). "High as Pride," seems to point the way towards the band's next release, Mei. A sharp observation here from Kull: "At 18 our convictions are hills on which we look/At 45 they're caves into which we hide." The band takes one easy target liberty: urbane yuppie types in "Gray Flannel Suits," which is probably the least of the tracks, though I do like the line about "martini glasses that shimmer all weekend." Apart from that, this is pretty compelling music throughout, and the lyrics are consistently top-notch. Like Mei, well worth a listen." - Ground And Sky
    $14.00
  • In Crescendo is the fourth studio album from this Italian progressive band.  While originally working in a purely metal direction, the band has expanded the scope of their sound to encompass elements of progressive rock as well.  There is a very strong atmospheric component similar to Riverside, Porcupine Tree, and Pink Floyd but the heavier, metallic side of Opeth and Dream Theater is clearly present as well.Over the past two years Kingcrow has expanded their fan base with a European tour in support of Redemption and Jon Oliva as well as appearances at ProgPower Europe and ProgPower USA.  An announcement about 2013 US tour dates is imminent. 
    $13.00
  • Christian Vander has been opening up the tape vaults releasing some prime (and some not so prime) Magma material. Mekanik Kommandoh is the previously unreleased original version of Mekanik Destruktiw Kommandoh which was rejected by their record label.
    $18.00