Boing, We'll Do It Live! (DVD/2CD)

SKU: BM0003
Label:
Boing!
Format:
NTSC
Region:
Region 0
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Deluxe digipak set from this amazing trio of Guthrie Govan, Marco Minnemann, and Bryan Beller.  It was filmed at Alvas Showroom in San Pedro, CA in June 2012.  The material is drawn from the Aristocrats studio album as well as the back catalog of the individual members.  Pro-shot DVD features a 5.1 surround mix courtesy of Steven Wilson.  The 2CDs feature the soundtrack to the set.  Oh yeah - the DVD is packed with live bonus material.

 

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  • "Counting Leslie West's July 1969 solo album, Flowers of Evil was the fourth album in 28 months for West and Felix Pappalardi's Mountain, and the pace was catching up with them: Flowers of Evil was only half of a studio album with five new songs, its second side filled up with a live 25-minute rock & roll medley and encore of Mountain's sole Top 40 hit, "Mississippi Queen." This was unmistakable evidence that Mountain had run their course. There would be live albums, compilations, and reunions over the succeeding years, but Flowers of Evil marked the creative end of a surprisingly short-lived enterprise. " - All Music Guide
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  • "For Flotsam and Jetsam, the heavy metal highway has been sprinkled with nails. First, the band's frontman Jason Newsted quit to seek his fame and fortune with Metallica. Then, after securing a major label deal, Flotsam and Jetsam were cajoled into toning down to appeal to the masses. Eleven years after releasing its classic album Doomsday for the Deceiver, the band returned to the label that signed it, writing more aggressive material than it had in years. High is a declaration of hate, brimming with full-fisted guitar riffs and head-bobbing beats--an unrestrained battle cry from a band that refuses to lay down and die." --Jon Wiederhorn
    $4.00
  • Four mammoth length drugged out tracks that will blast you off to the deepest part of the cosmos."The fifth instalment of the Cosmic odyssey on Paradigms. As as you will surely now expect, it's a potent kraut mammoth of the highest order. Four towering psych beasts inhabit this album, commanding 74 blissful minutes. You can hear one of them below.Only previously available on cassette, 'The Inner Sanctum' is now available as a luscious, limited digi-pak album, laden with glorious artwork and some of the band's hardest cuts. Only 500 of these wonders are available. THE COSMIC DEAD on top of their freak-out game, right here.."
    $16.00
  • After releasing a lengthy EP a few years ago, this eclectic French jazz rock band have returned with a full length release. I say eclectic only in that the instrumentation is a bit unusual: harp, vibes, electric guitar, bass, drums, trumpet, ao. The band's music is very melodic with a lot of energy. There is an obvious influence from Frank Zappa at his instrumental best (and they manage to leave Frank's humorous aspect behind). The band's name also gives away their affectation for the music of Gong - but of the later period when Pierre Moerlen was at the helm. The music of Forgas Band Phenomena also comes to mind. Very highly recommended.
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  • What needs to be said about this album? It's a complete masterpiece. This is the typical US Warner Bros pressing that's been kicking around for years.  CHEAP!
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  • "A more ruminative effort than Sanguine Hum’s well-regarded 2010 debut, The Weight of the World is post-prog in both the most “post” and the most “prog” sense of the words.Recorded at Evolution studios in Oxford, The Weight of the World finds Joff Winks, Matt Baber, Brad Waissman and Andrew Booker absorbing, and then brilliantly modifying, some of the best of what’s come before, imbuing The Weight of the World with the impressive gravitas of very familiar antecedent influences.For instance, dreamscape reminiscences associated with Radiohead (“System For Solution”) find a home here. There are whispers of Steven Wilson (“From The Ground Up”), too. You’ll recall the wonders of Gentle Giant (“Phosfor”), and the mesmerizing sound collages of Boards of Canada (“Day of Release”), as well. Yet, on free-form, ambient-meets-jazz-meets-math rock moments like “In Code,” Sanguine Hum never sounds like anything so much as itself.That holds true even when the band swerves into the murkier waters of epic songcraft, though — like much of this project — the title track takes shape slowly, or at least more slowly than Diving Bell. As it does, however, there is a lot to recommend about The Weight of the World — so much that reveals itself, so much that rewards repeated listenings.Even as its most complex, Sanguine Hum retains an approachability that steers these proceedings well away from any polyester-era excesses. In other words, The Weight of the World remains all proggy, but also all post-y — in the very smartest of ways." - Something Else! Reviews
    $15.00
  • "Whereas certain metal splinter genres like sludge and doom have found their requisite bands experimenting in ways that are still decidedly metal – or at least "extreme" by any measure – other areas such as black and post-metal see their own representatives in a practical race to see who can shed their extreme proclivities altogether. Alcest is one such band.Flirting with 90's indie rock trappings is nothing new for this French duo – essentially the one-man project of multi-instrumentalist Neige backed since 2009 by the drumming skills of Winterhalter – but Shelter is their first complete abandonment of metal altogether… there is nary a blastbeat, growl, nor brutal riff to be found anywhere on the album's concise 45-minute running time.That's not to say that Neige is reinventing the wheel, though; Shelter is a straightforward mix of 4AD dream pop and the type of ethereal post-rock that Explosions in the Sky are best known for… not to mention the gauzy shoegaze overlay that such an alchemy implicitly guarantees, of course.It sounds derivative on paper, but somehow Neige transcends his cookie cutter influences and produces a work of heart-stopping elegance and profundity. "Voix Sereines", in particular, is hands down the most plaintive and delicate work of the man's already illustrious career, a despondent lullaby of music box melodies and wistful singing that is fittingly placed in the middle of the track listing… it's the soul of the album, and belongs as its nucleus.The twang at the end of the guitar lines on the title track could – if taken out of context – herald the introduction of a new Mazzy Star single, but Alcest aren't quite that predictable. Twang aside there is no further evidence of roots rock assimilation, no blues aside from the heartache rendered potently clear in Neige's understated vocals. Nonetheless, this would make a fine crossover single aimed at whatever constitutes indie rock radio in 2014.Then again, so would "Away", which many reading this will insist even more a graceful composition than my pick of "Voix Sereines" above (those who aren't chastising the band for "going soft" in the first place, that is). I can't really argue that point, but all it does is prove what a deep bench Neige is culling for inspiration this go round.Perhaps the best evidence that Neige is not beholden to the orthodoxy of his influences is the way he builds toward a crescendo on album finale, "Délivrance". Rather than the ringing chimes that have become the hallmark of tension-building in post-rock (Explosions in the goddamn Sky), Neige shows restraint by settling for a very gradually rising chorus with subtle percussive acceleration. The final 2:30 minutes of the song consists of an unnecessary reprise, but in spite of contributing minor bloat it's still a fitting tribute to Neige's classical ambitions here.The word "masterpiece" gets thrown around a bit too frequently – often in service of albums that will be forgotten altogether a few years down the road – but if you can wrap your head around the fact that Alcest are no longer a metal band in any way, shape or form, Shelter is deserving of whatever hyperbole you care to throw at it." - Metal Injection
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  • "It all begins at the end of one man’s life. He hangs on the noose, lit by a single spotlight as a viscous clot of blood gradually oozes from his mouth. Misshapen, deformed and attired in archaic garments he dangles, suspended in death, as dark ambient shamans Ulver are hidden below him on a blacked-out stage.A piano plays a fragile lament while rumbling effects and growling samples ebb and flow. And a song that is one man’s coda becomes redefined as a sunrise is projected upon the screen behind the band, and Kristoffer Rygg steps up to the microphone to begin “EOS”. Thus begins Ulver: The Norwegian National Opera, the mesmerizing and stunning beautiful live DVD release from Norway’s masters of avant-garde and enigmatic electronica.Ulver of course know a few things about redefining expectations. At one stage they were a celebrated black metal band, but in the late ’90s they dispensed with the traditional accoutrements of black metal and morphed into an entirely different beast. Traces of their metal past remain fixed in their DNA, especially in their desolate iciness and forever-questioning aesthetic, but for many years now the band has been releasing acclaimed works that blend progressive electronica and glacial neo-classical treatments with shimmering, hypnotic rock.Aside from one show in 1993, Ulver had always been a studio-based outfit. But in 2009 the band was lured onto the stage for Norway’s Festival of Literature, which in turn led to them play a series of sold-out shows in some of Europe’s most renowned venues throughout 2010. Ulver: The Norwegian National Opera was recorded in Oslo at the end of that touring cycle, not long before the band went into the studio to record 2011’s highly rated Wars of the Roses album. Captured by 6 HD cameras, the show features guest appearances by electronics guru Christian Fennesz and performance artist Ian Johnstone (who plays the aforementioned role of the late Mr. Ark Todd, and look out for his inscrutable resurrection to end the show on an enigmatic note).The DVD features material from throughout Ulver’s electronic and experimental years, with tracks from the Perdition City, Svidd Neger, Blood Inside and Shadows of the Sun albums, and the Silence Teaches You How to Sing and A Quick Fix of Melancholy EPs. It’s best to think of the DVD in terms of an all-encompassing experience. Breaking the show down into constituent parts defeats its purpose entirely. I could obviously explain to you how the band’s performances of “For the Love of God”, “Funebre” or “Let the Children Go” play out in regard to the overall set, but there’s a clue on the DVD menu to remind you that plucking fragments from the show is inadvisable—there’s no ‘play all’ choice here, just one word: witness. That, more than any of the words I’m about to type, sums the DVD up perfectly.Spectacular visual accompaniments are projected on a mammoth screen behind the band. Ulver’s set is built atop waves of oscillating and juxtaposing currents, and as the rhythmic pulse shifts the imagery evolves. Varying images of mankind’s atrocities, nature’s majesty and preternatural mystery mimic the cadence of the show perfectly. The vast array of metaphoric, allegorical or representative imagery bolsters or offers a stark counterpoint to the tracks, and as the show progresses it becomes impossible to separate the visual from the musical.That’s not to suggest that taken in isolation the music is somehow lacking, it’s not, and a CD release of the soundtrack alone would be incredible. The vintage synths, creeping effects, droning guitar, dulcet vocals, piano and percussion that Ulver wield all fuse into a singularly mesmeric force. The set-list has obviously been assembled with a cinematic vision (perhaps operatic is more apt), and the music alone sets you on a path where the idea of stepping off is unfeasible. For 90-plus minutes the band unhurriedly manipulates and tweaks their sound. With many songs bleeding into one another, Ulver constructs a show that takes you on a skillfully paced, sweeping and euphonious voyage—where the pitch and sway, the crescendos and hypnotic undercurrents, guide you through a raft of emotive states.I had high expectations for Ulver: The Norwegian National Opera and I was not, for one second, anything less than enthralled. Expertly edited by Erlend Gjertsen, and mixed by the band at their own Crystal Canyon Studios in Oslo, the entire package is pristinely rendered, and is a sumptuous feast for the eyes and the ears. Ulver have always been a prime example of the transformative beauty of artists dedicated to producing work that is innovative and imaginative. And galvanized and inspired by celestial, terrestrial and otherworldly endeavors, Ulver: The Norwegian National Opera is a firm reminder of the transfixing (and yes, even transcendental) power of authentically progressive music. I couldn’t recommend it highly enough." - Hellbound.ca
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  • "James LaBrie is renowned for being the vocalist of prog metal gods Dream Theater. His solo albums show a heavier facet of his creative output and profit immensely from his incredibly varied voice. Now, the albums "Elements Of Persuasion", "Static Impulse" and "Impermanent Resonance" are being offered as limited box set at discovery price."
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  • Pink Floyd influenced doom.
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  • Live CD set with a bonus DVD of the performance by John Lees' edition of Barclay James Harvest. This was recorded at Metropolis Studios in London in December 2010. The DVD is PAL format (region 0) and also includes some interview footage. The CD features the audio from the entire performance.
    $15.00
  • A jaw dropping jazz rock monolith from an unlikely source - Southern Lord Records.  Fontanelle was formed years ago from the ashes of the space rock outfit Jessamine.  Led by guitarist Rex Ritter and keyboardist Andy Brown, the Fontanelle ensemble set out to recreate the sound of early 70s fusion icons Miles Davis and Herbie Hancock.  Vitamin F genuinely sounds like a mash up of Davis' Bitches Brew and Hancock's Mwandishi.  No other way to describe it.  The band is augmented with horns and lots of guests.  You would never imagine that these guys were connected with Sun O))).  Not only highly recommended but possibly 2012's best release.  "When Southern Lord Records – home of Eagle Twin, Sunn O))), Black Breath and Earth – releases an album by a jazz fusion collective, you know that things are not going to be entirely as you might expect. At the very least your expectations will be challenged, and it’s possible that you might be very surprised indeed. That being the case, then, what is this Portland, Oregon band all about?Well, the good news is that the music is challenging, engaging and intelligent; it takes its cues from jazz, fusion, post rock, avant-garde, ambient and even some forms of metal (doom, for example). Most obvious is the debt it owes to Bitches Brew (but then, what modern jazz doesn’t?), but there’s also Head Hunters-era Herbie Hancock and indeed something of Can in the mix.Metal it is not, but the boundaries of what musicians – and, for that matter, fans – will allow themselves to get involved with are more fluid than ever (think Alex Skolnick Trio and Steve DiGiorgio’s Dark Hall as two obvious examples). Add to that the phenomenon that is post rock with its penchant for extended, sometimes improvised pieces, and there is absolutely no reason why this album shouldn’t cross over successfully. Those with long memories or suitably expansive record collections can cast their minds back to the exciting, innovative movement that was ‘70s jazz fusion, with its links to the heavier side of music – John McLaughlin’s machine gun guitar, The Brecker Brothers’ Heavy Metal Be Bop and Jeff Beck’s Wired.So the influences are many, the lineage can be traced back to some of the key works in the pantheon and the album provides an eclectic mix of songs. It’s part acoustic, part electric: Fontanelle don’t tie themselves down to a particular style, or burden themselves with a musical template that must be used at all times. They are so much more than that. While there are moments of quiet, acoustic sound, there are also passages of fuzzed up keyboards, guitar and space rock-like electronica.Opener ‘Watermelon Hands’ needs no expansion of its influences – they’re hidden in plain sight – although the sound is in many ways just as close to an album like Future 2 Future as it is to Head Hunters. It has a steady tempo that introduces the album very well and features a host of sounds and instruments within its five minute duration. ‘The Adjacent Possible’ continues in a similar stylistic vein, although I like to think I can hear something of Ray Manzarek in there too. And understand that these comparisons are used purely to provide some context: the music is very much Fontanelle’s own sound and not something that is just derivative. It would do the band a huge disservice to fail to acknowledge the level of originality on display throughout Vitamin F. The band plays with sounds on ‘When The Fire Hits The Forest’ as effects-laden guitar and keyboard add a cosmic element to the song, its hypnotic rhythm the backbone upon which is hung the complexities of the composition. This is jazz for the new millennium, in spite of any ‘70s influences, the band really letting loose with wave after wave of musical themes and ideas.‘Ataxia’ utilises brass melody with a heavy accompaniment, perhaps as close to rock as you can get while still maintaining a jazz demeanour; while ‘Reassimilated’ is quieter but no less interesting as it brings the album to a gentle and satisfying close.If you like jazz or jazz fusion you will like this album, of that I have no doubt. If you’re not familiar with those musical genres, then Vitamin F could be the ideal place for you to start. It’s a great album and well worth checking out. " - Ghost Cult
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  • Great debut from this new Italian quintet.  Pure retro prog that channels the spirit of early 70s British prog.  The band's sound is dominated by organ and heavily spiced up with guitar and flute leads.  Hugh Banton or Tony Banks' roadie must have helped set up Paolo Tognazzi's organ because it seems like its ripped right out of 1971.  Vocals are in English and while Andrea Calzoni's accent creeps in now and then he aquits himself quite well - he's got a bit of an Ian Anderson thing going on.  Nice long instrumental breaks with keys playing off the flute and guitar.  Definitely a VDGG - Osanna - PFM - Orme vibe, but keep in mind the early versions of these bands.  1971 vs 1975.  This is the good stuff.  The REALLY good stuff.
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