For The Sake Of Revenge (DVD/CD set)

SKU: NBA1619-2
Label:
Nuclear Blast
Format:
NTSC
Region:
Region 0
Category:
Metal/Hard Rock
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NTSC Region 0 DVD of Sonata Arctica live in concert. Filmed at the Shibuya AX, Tokyo, Japan on February 5th, 2005. The DVD also features footage from the European 2004 tour and US tour of 2005. Comes with a bonus CD of the audio as well.

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