For The Sake Of Revenge (DVD/CD set)

SKU: NBA1619-2
Label:
Nuclear Blast
Format:
NTSC
Region:
Region 0
Category:
Metal/Hard Rock
Add to wishlist 

NTSC Region 0 DVD of Sonata Arctica live in concert. Filmed at the Shibuya AX, Tokyo, Japan on February 5th, 2005. The DVD also features footage from the European 2004 tour and US tour of 2005. Comes with a bonus CD of the audio as well.

There are no review yet. Be the first!

Product Review

You must login or register to post reviews.
Laser Pic

customers also bought

SEE ALL
  • 4 Destinies is the third album from Italian keyboardist Alex Carpani.  Its clear from this album that he has a great love for old school prog and "Rock Progressivo Italiano".  This is a concept album that consists of 4 epic length pieces.  Carpani's keyboard work shifts from the delicacy of Tony Banks to the pyrotechnics of Keith Emerson.  This is very much a symphonic rock album - plenty of Mellotron and Hammond organ through out.  Carpani handles vocals along with Joe Zal.  I'm not sure who is singing which parts but one of these guys reminds me a bit of Bernardo Lanzetti.  The lyrics shift between Italian and English.  Carpani has assembled an interesing band that includes The Watch guitarist Ettore Salati and drummer Alessandro Di Caprio of Ubi Maior.  A higher profile guest is ex-VDGG saxophonist supreme David Jackson.  Highly recommended."4 Destinies is a progressive rock concept album composed by Alex Carpani and based on 4 eventual destinies that a man can find on the path of his life. Four destinies that irradiate, moving from the same point, in four different directions of life...Musically speaking, this album represent a further step ahead in Carpani’s music production with more space for lyrics and vocals and less virtuoustic passages, with more atmospheric and contemporary rock moments compare to the previous works, even if Carpani’s symphonic songwriting is well recognizable, as well as his keyboards complex textures.The project involved all members of ACB: Ettore Salati on guitars, GB Giorgi on bass, Alessandro Di Caprio on drums and Joe Sal on additional vocals, plus David Jackson as special guest, and has been produced by Cristiano Roversi (Moongarden, John Wetton Band, Submarine Silence, CCLR). The album has been released by british label Festival Music, part of F2 Music Ltd."
    $16.00
  • DGM has been cranking out albums for years and with all the lineup changes they go through, somehow the music gets better and better.  Forget that Russell Allen and Jorn Viggo Lofstad guest on the album - sure that's cool.  More important are the facts that vocalist Mark Basile is rock solid and the band has come up with a perfect blend of melodicism, heaviness and proginess. (not sure that is a word).  This one makes all the right moves. File under: AWESOME!   Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • PERHAPS THE BEST $5 CD YOU WILL EVER BUY. Superb new progressive metal project put together by noted fretless guitarist Tim Donahue. He decided to go right to the top and put together a collaboration with Dream Theater's James LaBrie. LaBrie brought monster drummer Mike Mangini into the fold. In addition to fretless guitar (you have to hear it to believe it), Donahue plays all bass and keyboard parts. This is classy, epic progressive metal done right. Highly recommended!
    $9.00
  • New remastered edition of Sirens and The Dungeons Are Calling. Originally conceived as all of their debut album, the material was split up because it was too long for vinyl release. Jon Oliva states that this is the first time the material is appearing as it was conceived. This "complete session" release includes one new bonus track recorded by Oliva in 2010.
    $14.00
  • Deluxe mediabook edition.  CD plus a DVD with 5.1 surround mix, 24 bit stereo, and a "making of" video."Always fond of conceptual storytelling, Ian Anderson goes himself one better with his latest prog-folk-metal concept album. The 15 songs of Homo Erraticus inhabit not one but two metafictional layers. The Gerald Bostock character, hero/anti-hero of the seminal Jethro Tull album Thick as a Brick and its recent sequel Thick as a Brick 2, is back again, having now discovered a manuscript left behind in the 1920s by a malaria-ridden old British soldier delightfully named Ernest T. Parritt.Parritt's supposed writings range over northern European history from the Mesolithic era to his own - and on into his future, through the whole 20th century and into our own time and beyond. Winnowed into lyrics written by "Bostock" and set to music by the real protagonist of the story, Ian Anderson, these materials give Anderson - whose creative scope and energy remain robust even as his singing voice has thinned with age - a walk-in-closetful of pegs on which to hang a sequence of songs evoking nothing less than the history of mankind in his part of the world.The first track, "Doggerland," commemorates the area of the southern North Sea that used to be dry land connecting today's British Isles with the rest of Europe. Doggerland vanished under the waves as the last Ice Age ended but, as fisherman discovered not long ago, the sea floor retains much archeological evidence of human occupation. The succeeding songs address migrations, metalworking, invasions (from the Romans to Burger King), the arrival of Christianity, the Industrial Revolution, and so on. To appreciate the songs, you'll want to (at least once) follow along with the notes and lyrics in the accompanying 32-page booklet.The Foreword, in which Anderson discusses the history of Jethro Tull and why he hasn't used the band name for his last few recordings, will especially interest longtime Tull fans. The real question is, will the songs themselves? Some yes, some no. The gruff metal of "Doggerland" gives way to the sweet, plinking folk of "Heavy Metals." (I imagine Anderson chuckling to himself at the irony - no pun intended - of creating such a gentle-sounding song with that title, and on that literal topic.) Both satisfy my Tull craving. "Meliora Sequamur" (Let Us Follow Better Things), which paints a picture of 12th century schoolboys amid religious chant (and cant), does too, and "The Turnpike Inn" is a solid rocker, and the hard-Celtic style of "The Engineer" moves briskly.I like the instrumental track "Tripudium ad Bellum" (Dancing to War). It starts off with an echo of a theme from the original Thick as a Brick (there are others elsewhere on the album), then resolves into a 5/4 march, like a more insistent "Living in the Past." War's aftermath appears in the next track, the sad, deliberate "After These Wars," in which I really feel the lack of Anderson's full-strength vocals. While he was never among rock's greatest singers, that didn't matter - when he sang his songs, you always felt he was all there, and that's what mattered. But now, and not only in the harder songs that shade into old-school heavy metal, his voice just isn't always a match for his music's energy any more.On the other hand, his gift for crafting pleasing, original melodies, writing smart, clever lyrics in complete sentences and true rhyme, and setting much of it in non-traditional time signatures remains strong. The first verse of "After These Wars" reads:After battle, with wounds to lick andbeaus and belles all reuniting.Rationing, austerity: it did us good after the fighting.Now, time to bid some fond farewells andwalk away from empires crumbling.Post-war baby-boom to fuel with post-Victorian half-dressed fumbling.No one in pop music writes like that anymore.Listening to the album as a complete conceptual work, my overall feeling is that there isn't very much new here. Since the 1960s Anderson and Tull have explored countless different musical paths and styles. Some of these produced some of my all-time favorite songs and recordings. Others I hated. But he never seemed to be resting on his laurels. Here I feel like I'm reading a chapter that's not much different from the last chapter.But listening to the songs individually, I like a lot of them. As I write this I'm trying to count the beats of the off-time closer, "Cold Dead Reckoning," with its grim imagery of a future of lost souls navigating their way over a metaphysical Doggerland "amongst the ranks and files of walking dead." I hear crunching minor-key guitar-bass-piano unison figures, a sprightly flute solo. A hopeful verse about "angels watching over" at the end doesn't convince me, as the music continues to growl on as before. Yet there follow a sweet, gentle instrumental coda, reminded us that while things may not turn out well for humanity as we teem over and ruin our only planet, our capacity to create and to appreciate beauty will be with us as long as we live. So let's raise the cup of crimson wonder to Ian Anderson as he charges not-so-gently through his seventh decade." - Seattle Pi
    $17.00
  • German edition (with Taiwanese OBI) of the band's latest album. Supreme symphonic gothic metal.
    $13.00
  • ""In Debt" is a major collectable item with the folk-rock and psychedelic rock listeners and collectors. Today, original copies of this record fetch quite interesting sums when changing hands in record fairs or internet auctions.All tracks are original compositions, and the style is very personal. It's folk-rock, but many tracks are quite psychedelic too. But don't look close for influences, they will not come to mind that easily. Bill and Alan had their own psychedelic folk-rock style.Never reissued before in any format, now here we come with a splendid reissue. Remastered sound taken from the original mastertapes. A must!! "
    $9.00
  • "PAIN OF SALVATION are back with a stripped down acoustic album. 3 years since their last album “Road Salt Two” this album is seen as a follow up to the 2004 album “12:5”. The whole album was a reimagined version of 8 of their original tracks from different albums/EPs that the band has produced since forming in 1991. The album also includes a new song “Falling Home” (coincidently the name of the album) and two special covers of DIO’s “Holy Diver” and Lou Reed’s “Perfect Day”Starting off with the redo of 1997 track “Stress” you really see that the band have stripped down everything that they had on the song to begin with, there are less drums, less guitars, less of everything really. As for the song even if it was titles “Stress” it’s like a get up and go kind of song, personally I think it would relive any “Stress” and just make you feel so much better about your day, throughout the song you just get random bursts of instruments, a bug part that to me represent little bursts of energy that are an instant mood changer, I think that’s a really big thing in the song to pick up.Going through the album you see in tracks like “Linoleum”, “Chain Sling” , “Mrs Modern Mother Mary”,  “Flame To The Moth” and “Spitfall”  have really been stripped down of the heaviness of  Progressive Rock that PAIN OF SALAVATION are known for. Then there are songs that fit right in to the acoustic vibe, like “1979” and “To the Shoreline” the way that they were rearranged fir perfectly into the way that the album has been structured.  But you really do see what the band are capable of and as you’ve seen it before in previous albums, it shows that they know what they are doing and what direction they want the band to move forward in. They are not a band that wants to be stuck in the same musical pattern. You can see that as a band they have made sure that the transition between track to track has flowed smoothly, and because they’re songs from different albums it was important that the transition was easy, and these guys have executed it so well, you wouldn’t even think that the tracks have come from different albums.As for the covers of “Holy Diver” and “Perfect Day” I think were the best songs to go with the type of band that they are and they fit in well with the album. The covers of the two tracks were done brilliantly, and had a bit of PAIN OF SALVATION into the songs, which is what every cover should be about really. Finally the album title and last song of 9th album to be released from the band is “Falling Home” now this is definitely a way to end an album, it’s just a full on acoustic song from the start, all the way through you just have guitars and vocals which is how any acoustic song should be, and I think it just ties the whole album together. All in all what another great album from PAIN OF SALVATION." - Metal Temple
    $13.00
  • The Japanese East Wind label was active in the 70s and into the early 80s.  This was a jazz label that focused on Japanese artists but also covered many popular US players.  While not as overtly audiophile as Three Blind Mice, the East Wind label was always noted for immaculate reference quality production.Universal Japan has released 72 titles from the East Wind catalog in extremely limited editions.  We've cherry picked those titles that we think are of interest to our customer base.This monumental modal jazz set from 1975 features Masabumi Kikuchi (piano), Terumasa Hino (trumpet), Kohsuke Mine (tenor sax), Juni Booth (bass), and Eric Gravatt (drums).  The album consists of two side long pieces that showed the world that Japanese jazz was not merely aping US musicians.  This is as soulful and spiritual as you can get.  A dynamo performance enhanced with superior production.  After this Kikuchi started to explore fusion realms leading up to Kochi.  Highly recommended.
    $16.00
  • "The sophomore effort from the extraordinary drummer Sebastiaan Cornelissen featuring an all-star lineup - guitarists Alex Machacek, Mike Otram, Susan Weinert, Richard Hallebeek; keyboardists Gary Husband, Scott Kinsey, and Steve Hunt; and bassists Hadrien Feraud, Jimmy Earl, Gary Willis, and Tom Kennedy among others. Since first coming on the scene in the early 2000s, composer and drummer Sebastiaan Cornelissen has emerged as one of the most distinctive new voices on the European fusion scene. Whether acting as a leader, sideman, or group member, Cornelissen's playing combines a sharp sense of empathy and staggering technique with impressive improvisational grace and intensity."
    $8.00
  • "For composer and keyboard player Carl Westholm humanity's future is bleak, and ends in death. The apocalypse is at hand, and Westholm's Jupiter Society tells its inevitable and fateful story in the third effort From Endangered to Extinction. Again Westholm is helped by members of several Scandi bands including Carptree, Krux, Candlemass, Soilwork, Opeth, and Evergrey.Needless to say, with the bleak concept, this is a dark and despairing album, from lyrics to music, with Westholm's ominous synth layers establishing the foundation. Lyrically, the story revolves more around the invaders and destroyers of the earth, led by the Queen of Armageddon, possibly aided by some satanic element, mentioned in the song Invasion, rather than the people of earth.The latter, the people of earth, get some reference in the last three songs, but with little hope. The song Fight back is crushed in the vice of No Survivors and Defeat. It's not good day on Planet Earth. And this is where Westholm's song composition comes to the fore. The music intentionally propels the frustration, devastation, and defeat of humanity in both tone and power. In other words, this dark and bleak story gets played out in a proper musical context and, therefore, makes From Endangered to Extinction creative and engaging. But considering the subject matter, again, entertaining may become a highly contested moot point. Recommended." - Dangerdog.comThird album in the futuristic prog metal series from Carl Westholm.  You may know him from his involvement from Carptree, Krux, and Candlemass.  Westholm always puts together an interesting cast of musicians for these projects.  This time he draws from bands like Krux, Carptree, Candlemass, Soilwork, and Evergrey.  Most notable are the great Mats Leven (as one of a few lead vocalists) and Leif Edling of Candlemass.  Intense apocalyptic stuff with a cyber metal angle to it.  Highly recommended. 
    $15.00
  • According to the label's blurb this is "a must-have for all fans of Hammerfall, Sabaton, Helloween, & Iron Maiden". Believe it - record companies never lie.
    $15.00
  • "It seems these days that metal musicians collaborate with players from other bands quite a bit. Personally, I have mixed feelings when these collaborations happen. Sure, they can make some great music, but for some reason I tend to prefer what said players do with their main bands as opposed to their cross–band work. OSI is an exception to that.Started in 2002 by Fates Warning Guitarist Jim Matheos and former Dream Theater keyboardist Kevin Moore, OSI has remained a long–distance cooperative between the two. Several guest musicians have been brought in for each of their records, such as drummers Mike Portnoy and Gavin Harrison, bassists Sean Malone and Joey Vera, and vocalists Tim Bowness and Mikael Ã…kerfeldt. This most recent effort, their fourth, sees Gavin Harrison (Porcupine Tree) returning on drums, with Moore taking care of lyrics and main vocals. Matheos and Moore worked together on all other aspects of the music.As I said earlier, I typically listen to these kinds of albums once or twice and then return to their normal band’s material. But Fire Make Thunder isn’t an album to do that to; sure, it sounds very much like what you’d imagine this trio would create, but all three players are known for creating some great music on their own. And here, put together, they don’t disappoint.The opening track “Cold Call” and the follow–up “Guards” have a sort of sinister tone to it, but aren’t very aggressive tracks. “Indian Curse” is completely void of drums and percussion of any sort, and sounds rather bleak. It’s a good song, but don’t listen to it on a dark, rainy day in March. “Enemy Prayer” is much more metallic than its predecessors on the album, sounding a bit closer to what these two wrote in their main projects. It’s also an instrumental track, a key component of a prog metal record. “Big Chief II” continues the picked up the tempo a bit, and the guitars sound a bit angrier. But the vocals don’t really get that intense, lending a sense of control to the turmoil. “Invisible Men” clocks in at just under ten minutes long, so these two haven’t lost their touch when it comes to lengthy songs either.Thinking of something to compare this album to was difficult at first, but then it hit me. This album is like a horror movie that uses menace to scare, playing on the viewer’s mind, rather than excessive gore or monsters leaping suddenly out of nowhere. Granted, this music isn’t scary, but one can’t help but notice its dark tone. The ambience it captures is one of many things that make this album great. The album artwork is another–I like how the cover kind of reflects the primitive nature of the title, Fire Make Thunder.If the only kind of Prog Metal you’re into is twenty–minute songs with six trillion notes in them, this album won’t interest you in the slightest. None of these songs get even close to becoming exercises in technical wizardry. They are simply well written songs. Each one sounds unique enough that they don’t blend together. They’re short enough to keep just about any listener’s attention for the entire songs’ duration, and there’s enough creativity in each one to ensure that. Moore and Matheos have proved they can write material as well as any prog legend, without having to play more notes than God. This is an album both novices and prog experts will enjoy. Good job, OSI." - Muzikreviews.com
    $11.00
  • Tenth album from this prolific German band fronted by English vocalist Philip Griffiths who also is a member of Alias Eye.  PGM's brand of prog is squarely in the melodic vein with elements of neo and symphonic rock.  Flute is a nice addition to the mix and often evokes the feel of early Genesis.  The band is joined by Phil's father - the great Martin Griffiths who you should all know from Beggar's Opera (Time Machine!!!!).  He actually sings on 5 tunes and still has a great voice.
    $14.00