The Wake Live At De Boerderij (CD/DVD)

SKU: GEPCDDVD2001
Label:
Giant Electric Pea
Format:
PAL
Region:
Region 0
Category:
Progressive Rock
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CD/DVD set commemorating IQ's complete performance of The Wake at De Boerderij, Zoetermeer, The Netherlands on June 19, 2010. The CD follows the audio of the DVD but does not include the encores which are on the DVD. Encores are: "Infernal Chorus", "The Darkest Hour", and "Failsafe".

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    $14.00
  • "A concept album following the life cycle of a human being, childhood to citizen adult, the lyrics (and music) are replete with references to all of the odd destructive and self-destructive patterns our 'civilized' race has attached itself to. Brainchild of Athenian Nikitas Kissonas, Methexis' music is never predictable and always unexpected. Begin with The Enid's Joe Payne's amazing and enigmatic voice. (Please excuse my previous error in that I mistakenly thought it was Nikitas singing.) It seems that Joe can sound like anyone he chooses. Then focus on Nikitas' eclectic and stunningly diverse guitar soundings and stylings. Then try to pinpoint his influences, the styles he is drawing from in order to make his eminently creative and original songs. It is nearly impossible. This is music that draws from so many diverse and unusual styles and ideas. This is music that tests the capabilities, the combinations and permutations, that are possible within the realms of human expression using sound and music.1. "Chapter IV - Ruins" (4:49) starts the album with 'the end'! The fourth and final suite in the album's song-cycle, entitled "ruins," is what Nikitas chooses to begin his album with. I love it! It is an atmospheric 'post-apocalyptic' song much in the vein of Mariuz Duda's LUNATIC SOUL or even Norway's ULVER.2. "Chapter 1 - Exterior - Remember, Fear's a Relic" (6:11) opens with the energetic force of a great blues-based jazz-rock song--complete with Hammond organ, sassy horn section, and bluesy GINO VANELLI-like vocal. A surprise as this was quite unexpected but I have to admit: it is quite refreshing and enjoyable. The falsetto chorus is also quite unusual, but then, everything Nikitas creates is quite unusual and unexpected. Quite fun. (9/10)3. "Chapter 1 - Exterior - The Windows' Cracking Sound" (1:46) (9/10) is another unusual song for its surprising mix/engineering: the entire time a heavily treated electric guitar is slowly strumming the accompaniment to Joe Paynes' delicate, untreated voice, a drummer is jamming away at a very fast pace in the background. Once, at the end, the drums are brought up to front and center before being faded back to deep background for the horn opening of the next song, 4. "Chapter I - Exterior - Who Can It Be" (6:34) is a song performed by a horn ensemble with occasional whispered vocal and mid-song classical guitar interlude (including a brief slightly angular/diminished replication of Beethoven's "Ode to joy"). The post-guitar interlude shifts into PETER HAMMILL territory with some odd jazz instrumentation for accompaniment and the PH vocal. When thing amp back up--first via return of the horns and then full TOBY DRIVER-like band to spacey end. So odd! So outstanding! (10/10)5. "Chapter I - Exterior - The Origin of Blame" (3:27) starts out as a piano-accompanied cabaret-like vocal much in the MATTHEW PARMENTER style. The cacophonous 'chorus' is equally 'out there'--but so creative and idiosyncratic! This is such an amazing mind that can successfully weave such odd and unusual sounds and styles into the flow of this, a concept album. I call it genius! (10/10)6. "Chapter I - Exterior - Prey's Prayer" (6:07) is an instrumental support/setup for an amazing guitar solo. The guitar play reminds me of JEFF BECK, ROY BUCHANAN, HIRAM BULLOCK, or RAY GOMEZ! Great horn support. This is not a song to be missed! Guitar this sublime is too seldom recorded! (10/10)7. "Chapter II - Interior - Sunlight" (8:20) opens with some more adventurous guitar sounds before shifting into a sensitive acoustic guitar supported ballad--not unlike the recent work of JOHANNES LULEY including the voice (though on this song Joe's voice is more similar to that of RITUAL lead vocalist, Patrik Lundström). Quite unusual song structure and sound combinations. So like our enigmatic chameleon Nikiitas! Excellent song. The final section sounds like recent ECHOLYN before the solo voice closes in Peter Hammill fashion! (10/10)8. "Chapter II - Interior - The Relic" (8:28) opens with a minute of purposefully picked chords on acoustic guitar which are eventually joined by Joe Payne's equally composed yet emotional vocal. By the end of the second minute piano and then full band have joined in to support a multi-voiced chorus. In the instrumental fifth minute the music builds in layers and intensity before crescendoing and crashing into silence with a brilliantly placed audible sigh to restore the gentle yet plaintive sounds and structures of the opening. Piano and violin--and later cello--perform some nice soli to accompany the synth orchestral sounds. Nice Post Rock song. (9/10)9. "Chapter - Suiciety" (6:40) opens with a fast-paced, hard-driving PORCUPINE TREE-like sound of drums, odd spacey synth sounds and ominous keyboard bass chords until 1:37 when the drumming cuts the pace in half while the pile of ominous incidentals and washes mounts higher and higher. Then at 2:20 everything drops away to leave the slowly picked notes of a solo classical guitar. Cymbol play accompanies the addition of orchestral participation (I especially like the horns sections' contributions). This is then followed by a creative section in which the drummer creatively fills orchestra-supported 'space' with his cymbol and kit play. A return to full force in the ominous chord progressions crescendoes and decays while Joe Payne's treated voice alone fills the album's sad finale. (9/10)This is an awesome album of eclectic music! Being a concept album with songs integrated to express this elevates it a notch above Methexis' previous 2011 effort, The Fall of Bliss (which I also love). A brilliant masterpiece of modern progressive rock music--one that gets me so excited to come back to it and hear it again. Special shout out to Linus KÃ¥se and Nikos Zades, the keyboard player and sound design/D&B programmer, respectively. Amazing contributions! And Walle! Awesome play on the batterie! Check this one out, people!5 stars, definitely essential: a masterpiece of progressive rock music." - ProgArchives
    $15.00
  • ""It is a rare thing these days for a post-metal band to break the mold. So many bands play sludgy, lurching, epic metal that it can be hard to tell what band is trying to sound like Isis this time. This brings me to the breath of fresh air that is Secrets of the Sky.The Oakland based sextet takes what is a great but tired genre and adds a dash of black metal and a bit of prog. Imagine if you tossed Neurosis, more recent Immortal, and Porcupine Tree into a blender. Sounds like a fucked up mix, right? It's an awesome fucked up mix though.The Sail Black Waters consists of 4 tracks that are rooted in sludge, that manage to take twists and turns throughout it's all-too-short forty-one minute run-time. There are moments of dreamy soundscapes, harmonized clean vocals, and crescendos aplenty.A band they bring to mind is the Australian black-metal-with-a-violin band Ne Obliviscaris. They don't necessarily sound alike, especially because Secrets of the Skysimple aren't playing as fast, but their progressions are quite similar. Also, Secrets happen to employ a violin as one of the several talents of vocalist Garett Gazay. Their use of it is much more subtle than Ne Obliviscaris to the point where it becomes a game listening for it.In short, a phenomenal debut." - Metal Injection
    $14.00
  • Latest studio album from this lethal German band.  SBE was formed by guitarist Christian Peters in 2007.  The quartet (twin guitar, bass, and drums) will deeply satisfy the musicial appetite of any fans of 70s psychedelia, space rock, and doom metal.  They may well be the ultimate stoner rock band.Revelation & Mystery finds the compositions a bit tighter than previous efforts but that's a relative term when the title track runs past the 12 minute mark. Vocals don't interfere too heavily with the acid laced space trippin' guitar work.  Peters sings a bit and then they get down to serious business jamming their way into the cosmos.  If you are fan of early Guru Guru, Hawkwind, and Black Sabbath, or even Deep Purple you need to hear this band.  I got high just looking at the cover art.  This album is a total lease breaker to boot.  BUY OR DIE!  "The second album from Samsara Blues Experiment in as many years, Revelation and Mystery (World in Sound) takes a surprising turn in approach from their Long-Distance Trip debut, distilling the jams of the first record into more structured, song-based material. The tracks of Revelation and Mystery almost exclusively follow verse-chorus-verse patterns, and while part of the joy of listening to a song like “Singata Mystic Queen” from the prior collection was meandering along with it, Samsara Blues Experiment don’t completely lose sight of the journey in favor of the straightforward. Right from its start, Revelation and Mystery sees the four-piece layering guitar effects and infusing their parts with swirls and a spaced-out feel. It’s not that they’ve completely changed their methodology so much as they’ve shifted the balance within their sound. These structural elements were certainly present on Long-Distance Trip, but a cut like the semi-acoustic “Thirsty Moon” shows that Samasara Blues Experiment are able to work within these parameters to grow their songwriting. One gets the sense in listening to opener “Flipside Apocalypse” (which follows a 17-second nameless intro track) that this process is just beginning and that the band are still finding out what they want their sound to be, but that only makes Revelation and Mystery a more immediate, direct experience; the linearity of the album unfolding gradually as the songs move from the straightforward into the more sublimely jammed.Fast-paced rumbling from the bass of Richard Behrens in the surprisingly punkish beginning of “Flipside Apocalypse” is an immediate clue to the changes the last year have brought about in Samsara Blues Experiment. The mood is more active, less calming and chilled out than last time around, and the guitars of Hans Eiselt and Christian Peters – who also handles vocals – seem to be more concerned with riffing out than stacking layers upon layers, though there’s some of that too, even as later in the song a riff straight out of the biker rock milieu shows up and carries the song through to its end. I don’t know if it’s the result in some change in the band’s songwriting process or just how things happened to come out this time, but the change continues through “Hangin’ on the Wire,” which is genuinely hooky and thoroughly in the realm of heavy rock. A crisp production during the solo section brings to mind some of Queens of the Stone Age’s finer moments, and drummer Thomas Vedder locks in with Behrens’ own excellent fills with a few of his own. Peters, though, emerges at the head of the song. His vocals confident and effected in equal measure, he works quickly to establish the verse and chorus patterns, both worthy of sing-alongs, so that by the end, “Hangin’ on the Wire” feels like its earned its handclaps, and though “Into the Black” starts out more ethereal, with extended solo sections and a long instrumental introduction, the shuffle soon takes hold and it proves to be more boogie than nod.But perhaps “Into the Black” is where the band begins their subtle shift into more esoteric sonics, because as the soft strums and plucks and interplay of electric and acoustic guitars take hold on “Thirsty Moon,” the song feels neither out of place nor especially unexpected, which it very well might have if placed earlier on Revelation and Mystery. Peters’ vocal line feels a little rushed during the verse – it’s almost as though there were too many syllables to fit in the line – but the interaction of his and Eiselt’s guitars in the instrumental break and the balance between the guitar and Vedder’s drumming in the mix makes up for any such hiccups. Another chorus feels delivered more appropriately, and the progression cycles through again; solo section into chorus, solo section into chorus. And it’s not until Behrens’ highlight bass line begins “Outside Insight Blues” that it’s apparent just how much Samsara Blues Experiment put into the album’s flow. Added keys allow the guitars to go farther out into sporadic notes without sacrificing fullness of sound, but after about two and a half minutes, there’s a turn into riffier material that carries the groove through the next six. There are a few part changes, but things don’t really feel jammed out until the classic ‘70s boogie meets psychedelia of the last 90 seconds or so, blues harp and all. It’s a shift worthy of Siena Root, and the two-minute interlude “Zwei Schatten im Schatten” (in English, “Two Shadows in the Shadow”) follows suit with an appropriate marriage of Eastern and Western musical traditions with sitar and acoustic six-string. There’s something sweet and solemn in the intertwining melody, and it’s a passing thing on the way to the 12-minute closer, but worth paying attention to in a way that many interludes aren’t.Then, at last, comes the ending title cut. Worthy of its name, “Revelation and Mystery” caps the album with a sense of psychedelic majesty through which Samsara Blues Experiment show their ability to keep hold of a song no matter how deep into space they might also want to push it. The song winds. Its progression is at once driving and subdued, and of all the songs on Revelation and Mystery, it’s probably the best blend of all sides of what’s shown itself to be the band’s current sound. Of course, at 12 minutes, one could easily argue it has time to do and be all these things – with room left over for a bit of that sitar to show up as well among the guitar leads – but still, it’s another display of the maturity Samsara Blues Experiment have been able to take on in a relatively short amount of time (their demo gave first notice in 2008). Some bands need three years to learn and foster growth between their albums, and some bands need to play. If the jump between their first and second records is anything to go by, Samsara Blues Experiment would seem to be the latter. Wherever this stylistic form takes them, I don’t imagine it’ll be too long before we find out, but until then, the 47 minutes of Revelation and Mystery provide a varied and exciting listen worthy of repeat visits. Samsara Blues Experiment continue to progress, continue to impress." - The Obelisk
    $12.00
  • Nicely done remaster of the classic first solo album. If all you are familiar with is the old domestic vinyl pressing, this CD will come as quite a revelation. I remember how much improved the UK vinyl sounded back in the day. This was Gabriel's first solo album and you can tell that he was trying to find his own voice (no pun intended) while distancing himself from Genesis. He worked with a great lineup featuring Dick Wagner and Steve Hunter, Robert Fripp, Larry Fast, Tony Levin ao. Bob Ezrin's production was huge sounding - perhaps Gabriel wanted something that sounded very un-Genesis like. He got it. Curiously of all his solo albums this is the one that, musically speaking, sounds the most like Genesis. A deeply personal album, it features powerhouses like "Humdrum", "Down The Dolce Vita", "Here Comes The Flood", and of course "Solsbury Hill". An album that is ingrained in my soul and absolutely essential.
    $12.00
  • "Another excellent release from Poland's OSADA VIDA. Better than their last one "The Body Parts Party" in my opinion, but not as good as "Three Seats Behind A Triangle"."Uninvited Dreams" opens with a good heavy sound with keyboards. It settles when the vocals arrive 1 1/2 minutes in. It picks up before 3 1/2 minutes. Great sound 6 minutes in as the guitar makes some noise. Vocals are back to end it. "My Nightmare Is Scared Of Me" is my favourite track. Love those melancholic keys to open. It makes me think of OPETH's "Damnation". Drums then take over as they beat slowly as synths wash in with bass. Amazing sound. Those melancholic keys are back briefly before the song kicks in with guitar leading. Nice. It turns heavy with synths playing over top. Vocals before 3 minutes as it settles. It kicks back in at 6 minutes. "Childmare (A Goodnight Story)" kicks in hard with lots of heaviness and guitar. Vocals and riffs before a minute. Check out the bass and guitar 2 1/2 minutes in. Vocals are back followed by organ before 5 minutes. I like the section 6 minutes in with the relaxing guitar and heavy drums. It gets even better as it plays out. So uplifting 8 minutes in."Lack Of Dreams" opens with heavy drums as guitar joins in. It settles with synths but it's still powerful. Vocals follow including guest female vocals. How good is this ! It settles before 4 minutes then we get a sample of spoken words before it starts to build. So good ! Bass after 7 1/2 minutes then the band kicks in. It settles after 9 minutes with dual vocals. Guitar and synths follow. "Is The Devil From Spain ?" is a Spanish flavoured instrumental that sounds fantastic with those intricate sounds. "Is That Devil From Spain Too?" has a nice heavy sound to it with prominant bass. Guitar before a minute. Here we go ! It then settles some as synths lead the way before 4 minutes.The guitar is back 5 minutes in as it kicks in heavily. Keys before 6 1/2 minutes followed by guitar in a relaxing soundscape. "Neverending Dream" opens with some atmosphere. It picks up after 1 1/2 minutes. Vocals 3 minutes in. It kicks in more a minute later. A guitar solo after 4 1/2 minutes as bass throbs and drums beat. It settles with vocals before 8 minutes.Another great sounding album from this band. You have to pick up at least one of their last three records, you won't be disappointed." - ProgArchives
    $15.00
  • 2012 remastered edition of the 1979 album.  Comes with three bonus tracks.
    $15.00
  • "Hailing from Poole in Dorset, the band featured GARY MARGETTS on guitar and vocals, TRISTAN MARGETTS on bass guitar, vocals and synthesiser and TONY BROCK on drums.Formed in 1971, the band was originally known as Transient Sand and was managed by local promoter John House, a friend of GREG LAKE of EMERSON, LAKE & PALMER. Through this association Lake offered to produce the band, now known as Spontaneous Combustion. With Lake’s interest confirmed a recording contract was arranged with Harvest in the closing months of 1971."TRIAD” was the band’s second album, released in October 1972 and over the coming years has become a sought after Prog Rock classic.This Esoteric Recordings reissue includes three bonus tracks from the band’s singles of the period, two of which are previously unreleased on CD. It has been newly re-mastered from the original master tapes and features a booklet that fully restores all original album artwork with a new essay."
    $7.00
  • Live set recorded at Rosfest and Calprog in 2009. Touchstone are getting a lot of hype in the British press at the moment but that shouldn't deter you. The band's music is from the more melodic side of the prog spectrum. Fronted by Kim Seviour, she complements the band well. If you like your prog a bit light you should enjoy this band - they went over a ton at both festivals.
    $4.00
  • I'm going to cut to the chase: if you are a fan of Fish-era Marillion...if Peter Gabriel's voice makes you spooge...then you need to own this disc.A Time Of Shadows is the second album from this Irish neo-prog band heavily influenced by vintage Marillion. Vocalist Liam Campbell is excellent and clearly from the Fish/Gabriel school. Good long tracks filled with melodies but still plenty of intricacies. Beautiful artwork from Ted Naismith rounds out a superb package. If the words "clutching-at-straws" gives you goosebumps you are a click away from musical nirvana. Highly recommended.
    $3.00
  • One of the finest releases of the era "Procol Harum” captured the exquisite song writing of Gary Brooker and Keith Reid and the excellence of the musicians in the group, namely Gary Brooker (voice, piano), Robin Trower (lead guitar), David Knights (bass guitar), B.J. Wilson (drums) and Matthew Fisher (Hammond organ). The overall result was a collection of songs that would prove to be truly ground breaking, despite only having being released in Mono at the insistence of producer Denny Cordell.Newly re-mastered from the original tapes, this Deluxe edition of "Procol Harum” has been expanded to include 27 bonus tracks (8 previously unreleased) over two CDs, including the classic singles "A Whiter Shade of Pale”, "Homburg”, along with rare B-sides, alternate session takes and stereo mixes and seven previously unreleased BBC Radio sessions from June and September 1967.This expanded deluxe edition of "Procol Harum” also includes a lavishly illustrated booklet that fully restores the original album artwork and features a new essay by Procol Harum biographer Henry Scott-Irvine, along with a facsimile promotional shop poster for the release of the album in January 1968.Disc One1. CONQUISTADOR2. SHE WANDERED THROUGH THE GARDEN FENCE3. SOMETHING FOLLOWING ME4. MABEL5. CERDES (OUTSIDE THE GATES OF)6. A CHRISTMAS CAMEL7. KALEIDOSCOPE8. SALAD DAYS (ARE HERE AGAIN)9. GOOD CAPTAIN CLACK10. REPENT WALPURGISBONUS TRACKS11. A WHITER SHADE OF PALE12. LIME STREET BLUESA & B SIDES OF SINGLE13. HOMBURG14. GOOD CAPTAIN CLACK (SINGLE VERSION)A & B SIDES OF SINGLE15. ALPHA16. SALAD DAYS (ARE HERE AGAIN) – PREVIOUSLY UNRELEASEDRECORDED AT OLYMPIC STUDIOS, LONDON – 29th MARCH 196717. UNDERSTANDABLY BLUERECORDED AT OLYMPIC STUDIOS, LONDON – 17th JULY 196718. PANDORA’S BOX (INSTRUMENTAL)RECORDED AT ADVISION STUDIOS, LONDON - 24TH AUGUST 196719. CERDES (OUTSIDE THE GATES OF) (ALTERNATE MONO MIX)20. SOMETHING FOLLOWING ME (ALTERNATE MONO MIX)Disc Two1. A WHITER SHADE OF PALE (EXTENDED EARLY VERSION)RECORDED AT OLYMPIC STUDIOS, LONDON – 29TH MARCH 19672. HOMBURG (EXTENDED STEREO VERSION)3. REPENT WALPURGIS (EXTENDED STEREO VERSION)RECORDED AT ADVISION STUDIOS, LONDON - AUGUST 19674. CONQUISTADOR (1971 STEREO MIX)5. SHE WANDERED THROUGH THE GARDEN FENCE (1971 STEREO MIX)6. SOMETHING FOLLOWING ME (STEREO MIX)7. MABEL (UNDUBBED STEREO MIX)8. KALEIDOSCOPE (STEREO MIX)9. CERDES (OUTSIDE THE GATES OF) (STEREO MIX)10. HOMBURG (1971 STEREO MIX)11. MORNING DEW12. A WHITER SHADE OF PALE13. MABEL"EASYBEAT” SESSION 14th JUNE 1967 BBC LIGHT PROGRAMME PREVIOUSLY UNRELEASED14. HOMBURG15. GOOD CAPTAIN CLACK16. SHE WANDERED THROUGH THE GARDEN FENCE17. KALEIDOSCOPE"TOP GEAR” SESSION 27th SEPTEMBER 1967 BBC RADIO ONE PREVIOUSLY UNRELEASED 
    $19.00
  • Tiger Moth Tales is the working name for British multi-instrumentalist Peter Jones.  Mr. Jones has great facility on all instruments and all the more impressive considering he is blind.  He's also a fine vocalist, having had a run on the British X-Factor competition.Cocoon is a conceptual piece based around the four seasons.  The album has a contemporary sound but there are some obvious old school references.  Genesis, Steve Hackett and Anthony Phillips solo work seems to be an influence as is the carnival elements of Haken.  In many ways I'm reminded of Big Big Train - one would think they drank from the same well.  Take something old and create something fresh.  No metal here although some flashes of heavy guitar now and then which work well against the acoustic bits.  Hackett vs. Phillips.  Not sure what it is about the British prog musicians but every once in awhile they create something that has a certain peaceful, tranquil vibe.  I often refer back to that old "Rain" album.  Long on mood and maybe short on chops.  Here we have the mood but Mr. Jones has injected the chops as well.  Highly recommended.
    $10.00
  • The third album from Haken once again demonstrates why they are at the forefront of the progressive metal scene.  The first two albums Aquarius and Visions are quite different.  Aquarius is a much quirkier album - lots of twists and turns that kept you off balance through out.  It had more of a prog rock feel and some real oddball approaches that resulted in some reviewers referring to it as circus meteal.  Visions was quite different.  It was much more linear and clearly defined in terms of content.  It was a prog metal album and wonderful one at that.The Mountain is the first release for the band's new home at Inside Out.  The direction of the band takes a bit of a u-turn.  The music falls somewhere in between the first two.  There is a quirky, prog rock vibe but you get the heaviness and complexity of prog metal.  One particular track I keep going back to is "Cockroach King" which essentially pays homage to Gentle Giant's counterpoint vocals.  Regardless of which direction you preferred, The Mountain has enough diversity to go please everyone.If you want to keep track of where progressive metal is headed then climb the mountain - this is where its at.  Highly recommended.
    $14.00