Vampire State Building (Vinyl)

SKU: LHC122LP
Label:
Long Hair Music
Category:
Jazz Rock
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Rare German jazzrock originally released on the Philips label in 1971. The music of Alcatraz is based around Klaus Nagurski's flute/alto sax trading off with the fuzz distorted guitarwork of Klaus Holst. Long jamming tracks remind me more of Traffic than "Miles Davis meets Deep Purple" as purported by the label. A great one either way.  Higly Recommended.

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  • BluRay containing a full live footage (filmed in Cologne), “Behind The Scenes” of the Kaldeidoscope World Tour 2014, band interviews and 3 further live tracks (filmed in Tilburg)Tracklisting BluRay: Live in CologneInto The Blue (26:12)My New World (17:29)Shine (07:22)The Whirlwind Medley (29:34)Beyond The Sun (04:24)Kaleidoscope (31:30)Neal & Roine Duet (03:41)We All Need Some Light (05:56)Black As The Sky (08:43)Encore:Medley: All Of The Above / Stranger In Your Soul (26:06)Bonus Material:(A behind the scenes look at: Kaleidoscope World Tour 2014)2. Band Interviews (22:31)3. Bonus Live Performances:3.1. Nights In White Satin (Live in Tilburg) (07:46)3.2. Sylvia (with Thijs van Leer - Live in Tilburg) (03:46)3.3. Hocus Pocus (with Thijs van Leer - Live in Tilburg) (07:53)Additional extra: Mike Portnoy vs Neal Morse in "Name That Beatles Tune"
    $16.00
  • Third album from this New Jersey symphonic rock band.  All of the band's albums are conceptual pieces based around literary works.  In fact the band's name is derived from a Ray Bradbury story.  On A Dark And Stormy Night is based on Madeleine L'Engle's fantasy novel of the same name.  The album is a wet dream for any fan of symphonic prog.  As I make my way through the album I'm frequently reminded of some similarities to Glass Hammer.  This is very keyboard driven music with a healthy amount of guitar leads.  There are even some nice Mellotron sounds popping up now and then.  These guys dream big and hit the mark.  Highly recommended.
    $11.00
  • 2LP 180 gram vinyl is a gatefold sleeve."When Mark Trueack announced the break-up of Unitopia, the feeling was like that of losing a close friend or family member. But Mark Trueack, (Truey), has been working on many projects at the same time. The United Progressive Fraternity evolved from the collaborations of some of Truey's favorite artists on a solo album yet to be released. The project took over Truey's consciousness to the point that he temporarily put aside the solo album to help assemble this cast of creative and innovative artists. Like a fraternity, this is no young bunch of artists trying to find their way. These are seasoned and experienced artists from some of prog rock's premier bands. The "fraternity" includes honorary members Jon Anderson and Steve Hackett amidst a cast of "Who's Who" in modern prog rock. The wonderful thing about the fraternity is that it will expand and grow over time to include some excellent surprise contributors in the future.But that is the future…let's talk about the present and their debut, Fall in Love with the World.The United Progressive Fraternity, for this debut album include some familiar names like Matt Williams, guitar; Dave Hopgood, on drums; Tim Irrgang, on percussion and Mark Trueack, on vocals; all from the band Unitopia. The Fraternity also includes original members: song-writer Guy Manning, (Manning and The Tangent), on vocals and keyboards; Daniel Mash, (Maschine, The Tangent), on bass guitar; Marek Arnold, (Seven Steps to the Green Door), on wind and keys; and Steve Unruh, on violin and flute. Honorary members include Jon Anderson, formerly the voice of the rock legend Yes: and Steve Hackett, on guitar, formerly the exquisite and innovative guitar sounds of the rock legend Genesis. Claire Vezina, also brings her beautiful vocals to the project.To open the album, what better way than with an overture? And "We Only Get One World" is full of sounds of voices from around the world mixed well with intricate and exquisite percussion, soft acoustic guitar and sounds from throughout the world all surrounded by a powerful heartbeat of drums. Like the opening of a classic Disney movie or a symphony of the world it welcomes you to the fraternity. The four minute overture sets the table well for the feast to come."Choices" introduces the theme of the album: protect the Earth, before it's too late. The opening classic radio excerpts that Unitopia has been famous for adding to the opening of its tracks is back. They are really a great way to introduce a song and Truey always selects an interesting and diverse spectrum of excerpts that fit so well. I think this might have been one of his best.Then Truey sings, "Choices make the world go round". Yes of course. But the world music surrounding this peace and the eerie stillness of the sound just force us to contemplate our future and meaning of life on the planet even deeper. That underlying Squire - like chunk of bass Daniel Mash is playing has an awesome King Crimson/Yes quality that adds that special touch to the track. Williams guitar is inspired and the solo sax from Marek Arnold is a fortunate treat.Hopgood, on drums and Arnold on clarinet open the third track, "Intersection" with a cool jazzy spirit. Then Truey returns with powerful vocals, "Hello will you stand in my way. Do you fall?" Do we ascend or fall? A very good question. Truey's warning reminds us of the choice we still have if we choose to exercise it. The keyboards, guitar and sax soloing are excellent. This music reminds me of the intricacy and the powerful design Unitopia used to create such a powerful mix of jazz and progressive rock elements. Irrgang's percussion tingles the ears."The Water" is one of the album's powerhouse highlights. Imagine getting to sing with your idol. Well Truey has always been a Jon Anderson on vocals, Yes fan; like many of us. This time he gets to sing with Jon about something that both artists feel strongly about in the world. The drying of the Earth. A powerful driving force uniting two powerful vocal talents...and members of the progressive fraternity…by coincidence. Williams guitar is innovative and a driving force throughout the production."Don't Look Back", is loosely based on a story Truey told me about an adventure that occurred to Unitopia accidently on their first tour in Europe. It was a wrong left turn that could have had disastrous effects on one of the first shows of that tour. But as Truey sings in the refrain, "Don't look back…no left turn". You can, as Truey sings, "shout with frustration, it's only direction I seek, in another world where no one understands the language I speak". Any world traveler or adventurer has felt the frustration. But the metaphor can mean oh so much more to one's life. Matthew's guitar and Arnold's clarinet add that perfect old world charm as Hopgood's heartbeat drums and Mash's bass help mimic Truey's heartbeat during the ordeal. Excellent work."Travelling Man (The Story of ESHU)" is my favorite track on the album. It is full of a worldwide sound of music and plenty of deep thinking. The story goes far back in time, beyond the famous "Crossroads" sung about by the famous blues singers of the American South. I will not spoil the story. After all you can Google it these days. But listen to the music as you are listening to Truey sing. The assemblage of music on this epic long track is full of the expanse of time and world cultures brought together by this fraternity of progressive artists. Along with Steve Unruh's flute you can hear one of my other favorite highlights of the album Steve Hackett's guitar soloing. That guitar is instantly recognizable. Unruh's violin helps add to the world celebration of this album. As Mark sings, "When will we all re-unite!" Manning's keyboard interlude just before Matt Williams rocking guitar solo is yet another highlight. Steve Unruh's violin solo immediately conjures memories of Charley Daniel's fiddle duel on "The Devil Went Down to Georgia". Everything you can imagine from an epic and more. The wonderful slow guitar solo that accompanies Truey at the end will bring tears almost as full as the ending of Unitopia's "Garden". I will not spoil it by providing the lyrics here. With Claire Vezina accompanying him it helps close one of the best songs of the year."Fall in Love with the World" opens with this strange poem by a guest narrator. It is actually yours truly. Yes, Truey invited me to write a short intro poem for the title track. Which was quite an honor. Thanks Truey. The title track is yet another classic highlight of what will truly be the group debut album of the year. This song sums up the weight and power of the message of this album. Enjoy life and this Earth to the best of your ability, but don't take what you don't need, and take good care of what has been given. Williams guitar and Truey's vocals rise to the usually strong levels we all remember from Unitopia. The refrain is perfect, "Fall in love with the world. The world needs to fall in love". It will have you singing along."Religion of War" closes the album with yet another powerful lyrical track asking us why faith must always be linked to violence. It is a powerful piece of music as well. Manning's innovative keyboard creations open the track with Truey singing, and Matt Williams and Daniel Mash providing their own guitar innovations. Hopgood's heartbeat drums keep great pace. Truey sings poignantly "It's not what your maker had in mind".All of the news out of the Middle East and around the globe is a reminder that these battles continue unending. Like a wink back to Genesis' "Blood on the Rooftops", the news continues to distract us from what we were meant to do here on Earth.If you order the deluxe edition, you will receive an extended version of "The Water" which is well worth the price. More orchestration and more of Matt Williams' excellent acoustic guitar work at the opening along with powerful vocal statements from Truey and Jon will complete this collection.Ed Unitsky's artwork is over the rainbow great. Ed simply is one of the best artistic interpreters of music on this planet and he outdid himself this time.Don't miss this innovative and complete debut for this globally expressive band. For fans that were worried about the breakup of Unitopia…there is no need to worry anymore.You are part of the fraternity. The fraternity of the world which we all belong to and are meant to enjoy. This is a truly extraordinary debut for a band that will be making major strides in the future." - Sea Of Tranquility
    $20.00
  • Exile is the long awaited third album from this British progmetal band.  To-Mera is fronted by Julie Kiss with the principal songwriting coming from guitarist (and her husband) Tom MacLean.  Some of you may recognize Tom's name from his membership in Haken as their bassist.  It gets slightly more confusing as Haken's main composer/guitarist/keyboardist is To-Mera's keyboardist Richard "Hen" Henshall.  Yes life can get complicated sometimes.The new album is a conceptual work about human existence.  Ms. Kiss' vocals flow like a constant river over some real bad ass and complex prog metal.  At times MacLean breaks out some incredible fusion leads taking the band in a whole different direction.  Hen's keys have a very specific sound.  At times you will be reminded for a moment of the Haken sound but in general this doesn't sound like a Haken album.  The album does feature some special guests...Marcela Bovio (Stream Of Passion), Stefan Forte (Adagio), and Ray Hearne (Haken) all make appearances.  An intricate and involving listen, this is easily going to be one of 2012's best metal releases.  Highly recommended.
    $14.00
  • Officially licensed vinyl reissue from the Greek Missing Vinyl imprint. First album from this great German band, originally released on Kuck Kuck in 1970. While later efforts would have jazz rock undertones, this debut plays it pretty straight ahead...well as straight ahead as a prog band from Germany in 1970 can sound. Remigius Drechsler's guitar leads vary from jangly to fuzzed out. Hennes Hering (future Sahara keyboardist) concentrates on organ and is definitely influenced by Rick Wright. Vocalist Moran Neumüller is passable but his main contribution to the band is flute and sax - both of which are featured lead instruments. Perhaps not their very best work but still a great one. Highly recommended.Official reissue from the Greek Missing Vinyl label - licensed from Kuckuck. Shockingly the band's lineup stayed intact for their second effort. The album featured better production and you can hear the band is a bit tighter. The jazz element is slightly turned up a notch as Moran Neumüller's sax work is going full blast and with much more authority. Hannes Hering's organ really rips - he's much more agressive than on Wake Up. Remigius Drechsler has a psych/blues edge to his guitar leads. Overall one in reminded a bit of Traffic at their jamming best. One of the great German prog albums of the 70s. Highly recommended.Foreign customers please note we may have to adjust your shipping charges to to the extra weight of the vinyl.
    $29.00
  • In Hoc Signo is the blowtorch debut from this Italian band playing in the "Rock Progressivo Italiano" style.  Its a young band based out of Rome.  Their goal was to use vintage sounds and replicate the sounds of the 70s and they do it in spades.  Mellotron M400, Hammond B3 Organ, Mini Moog Voyager, Electric Piano, Elka Synthex - all the good keyboard stuff that will send chills down your spine.  Killer lead licks on violin and guitar fight for space with the keys.  I'm reminded of Quella Vecchia Locanda, PFM, King Crimson and Le Orme!  If this isn't enough the band added a couple of guests: Anglagard's Mattias Olsson plays on a track and helped with arrangements.  The legendary David Jackson plays sax and flute.  This one kills and it kills and it doesn't stop killing.  BUY OR DIE!
    $16.00
  • "Are we being manipulated? Who would benefit from us, to follow pre-established rules? Careless. As sheeps. Political parties? Religious organisations? Commercial companies? TV networks? Beware of everything, even NEMO...NEMO is one of the leading Prog Rock bands in France, and after 13 years of existence they conquered the world community of Prog lovers with their previous albums (Si, Barbares, R€volu$ion…). Their 8th studio album is about every kind of manipulation. On 2 CDs, 12 songs, they warn you about everyone, even them! Musically you will hear a varied and strong blend of what Nemo is all about, featuring a big dose of experimentation and new exploration. Beware of this album, you will succumb to its charms! "CD1:01. Stipant Luporum 2.0102. Trojan (Le ver dans le fruit) 8.5303. Milgram, 1960 5.5904. Verset XV 7.5505. Un pied dans la tombe 7.1106. Neuro-Market 6.3407. Le fruit de la peur 9.43CD2:01. A la une 5.0802. Triste fable 7.4603. Allah Deus 5.0804. Opium 9.1005. Arma Diania 17.19
    $22.00
  • Produced by Billy Cobham, Forest Of Feelings is the first solo album from David Sancious, originally released in 1975.  It was recorded after his exit from the E Street Band.  Its an incredible blend of prog rock and fusion.  Its a trio format with the rhythm section held down by his former bandmate Ernest "Mad Dog" Carter on drums and Gerald Carboy on bass.  As proficient as he is as a keyboardist, most people overlook his attributes as a guitarist.  The man can play!This was briefly available on CD in 1992, and if I recall the story correctly, was withdrawn for sale due to legal threats by Mr. Sancious.  Its always been a tough disc to find.  Highly recommended.
    $18.00
  • 2LP 180g vinyl in a gatefold sleeve."It’s been quite a past few years for the incredible Anathema. Honors have been bestowed upon them, they’ve released an instant classic album in “Weather Systems”, and last year they released one of the best live concert films I’ve ever seen, “Universal”. Anathema is on top of the world, and they are only getting bigger. With all of this on their shoulders, they approach the world once again with their new album, “Distant Satellites”, a fitting name for a massive album. Again, with all of their recent success creating huge expectations, can this band meet such critical reception? Needless to say, Vincent Cavanagh on vocals, Danny Cavanagh on guitar, Jamie Cavanagh on bass, John Douglas on percussion, Daniel Cardoso on drums, and Lee Douglas with her wonderful vocals were all up to the challenge.“Distant Satellites” is a very different album from “Weather Systems”, or anything else they’ve done, for that matter. It is different, yet somehow instantly familiar. It includes everything that makes them Anathema, but adds new and exciting elements to their already excellent formula. If you’ve never heard Anathema, their formula (in their last few albums, anyways) includes soaring guitars, amazingly catchy melodies, spiritual lyrics, and emotional flow both vocally and structurally. They are the masters of melody, and they remain complex and progressive even while being simple and accessible. They are truly masters of their craft.This new album, then, is no different in those terms. The melodies return in force, such as the serene beauty of “The Lost Song” parts 1-3. And, yet, there is something different here. The melodic lines are somewhat more complex, less in-your-face, and more organic. This especially shows in the song lengths, most of them being over five minutes. This allows for more growth and more progression. Indeed, then, the melodies on “Distant Satellites”, while not being as instantly lovable or recognizable, are certainly more difficult and possibly will have a longer “shelf life” in my mind. Yes, the orchestrations seem to be lower key, as well, allowing the vocalists to express themselves more personally then ever.There are other improvements, too. I feel that the musicianship is more fervent and on a higher plateau of difficulty than Anathema has tried. Drummer John Douglas, especially, plays amazingly well from start to finish, accenting the music with awesome pounding and fills. The rest of the band are at their peak, too, with Vincent and Lee being especially great with emotional and meaningful vocal performances.“Distant Satellites” is different in more meaningful ways, too. Utilizing post-rock/metal structures is nothing new for Anathema, but they really do perfect them here, as on “Dusk”, a dark, climactic song. Yet, there is a sense of continuity between tracks, too. This is obviously the case between the three parts of “The Lost Song”, but it’s also apparent throughout the album, as if Anathema is telling us a story, convincing us of our true selves and our connection with the universe and with each other.This album is wonderful in the first half, but my excitement reached new heights in the second half. Anathema has taken it upon themselves to change things up a bit. They wanted to progress their sound, but make it all seem so natural. So, in the second half, the album climaxes with one of the best songs, simply called “Anathema”. But then, we are thrown for a loop somewhat, as “You’re Not Alone” features a hefty portion of electronic vibe. It’s great, but the best is still to come.Next, “Firelight”, a darkly ethereal instrumental track that is completely electronic, is thrust upon us, and is followed up by what may possibly be the best song Anathema has ever produced, “Distant Satellites”. This track combines everything that has ever made Anathema great: soaring melodies, climactic structure, gentle spirituality, amazing vocals, and now an electronic beat that is both complex and catchy. Vibrant, mesmerizing, and pure, this track elates me every time I hear it. It takes this album, and my heart, to new heights. The album finishes with a gentle ballad that just seems so fitting, yet it still has the strong electronic influence.So, is “Distant Satellites” a winner? In every way! Is it their best album? I don’t know; it has the potential, but it might take time, just like “Weather Systems” did. What I can tell you is that this new album is more mature, more progressive, more interesting and eclectic, and less formulaic then anything Anathema has crafted yet. It does sacrifice some accessibility and some instant likability for these things, but I respect their decision massively, and I fully expect to see “Distant Satellites” at the tops of many lists at the end of 2014." - Progulator
    $30.00
  • "Marbles was originally released on the band's own Racket Records label and attracted a lot of attention when it was released as the album had been funded by donations from fans who had pre-ordered the album before they started recording in return for having their name printed within the album artwork (over 18,000 names). This new 2CD Madfish edition of the album is packed in a deluxe 36 page digibook re-worked by original designer Carl Glover. The book features unseen pictures not used in the original artwork. The tracks on the second disc have previously only been available through the band's own website."
    $13.00
  • Saw this band perform a couple of months ago and it was an incendiary set.  Goat are a Swedish psychedelic collective.  Their music is incredibly intense that has an African tribal feel - sort of like Black Sabbath meets Fela Kuti.  Twin guitar leads entwine over a propulsive and hypnotic rhythm section.  The band's two female vocalists sing in unison.  Washed in a sea of reverb their voices come across as one.  Love the beautiful fuzzed out guitar leads that juxtapose with the crystalline solos.  This is not late night listening.  This is invite your friends over, fire up a big phatty, and trance out.    BUY OR DIE!"When approaching the follow-up to a record as unilaterally praised and, on a personal level, so intoxicatingly enjoyable as Goat's 2012 debut World Music, all kinds of anxieties are inevitably thrown up regarding the new work's comparative merit. Which is why for this writer, on hearing how the psych journeymen chose to open their latest record Commune – with the ominous clang of a temple bell (like a theological inversion of the opener on Black Sabbath's debut) – it felt oddly apt, fateful almost. It was as if they knew I was scared to listen to the record; they responded by scaring me further with ecclesiastical percussion instruments.Goat should be given full credit for inspiring this sense of meaning and excitement; the album that follows is no stylistic leap forward for the band, yet it still exercises a deeply persuasive power over your head and hips. They largely stick to the heavy, kinetic, afro-influenced rock that proved such a winning formula, the only obvious developments being that the guitarists seem to be taking more cues from desert-rockers like Tamikrest and Tinariwen, and the songs show an increasing preference for subtlety over immediacy in the hooks department. Yet despite the apparent lack of new ideas here, the undeniable success of this work lies in Goat's deepening and development of the musical and spiritual themes presented on in World Music.And I'd go as far as to argue that Commune is very much a spiritually informed record. Whilst Goat hinted at a certain kind of gently cosmic, communal worldview via the obscure vocal samples on their debut, on this record their spiritual statement feels much more pronounced. Not only can this be seen in the song titles (opener 'Talk To God', 'The Light Within') and the appearance of more vocal samples ("There is only one meaning of life, and that is to be a positive force in the constant creation of evolution" – woah there!), but it's also evident in the production. Instruments are slathered in embalming-chamber reverb, ritualistic hand percussion is laced through almost every track, and the more laidback atmosphere means that instead of getting party-starting booty-shakers like 'Run To Your Mama' we get absorbing, contemplative grooves like the headspinning rhythms of 'Hide From The Sun' and 'Bondye', an instrumental track named after a voodoo deity which realises the trance-inducing implications of repetition. When Goat first emerged listeners may have been unsure about the sincerity of their transcendental allusions, and I for one suspected that their flirting with hippy ideologies was a self-conscious part of their selling point. However, with Commune, I'm now convinced this band genuinely have something to say. On tracks like 'Goatslaves' for example, you can actually make out quite easily what the vocalists are singing, and the message is direct: "Too many people living on their knees", yell the female voices over a stern, militant beat. "Dying of freedom, Dying of peace".There are some fuzz tones that are just so gnarly and righteous that they make you glad to be alive. Lots of guitarists nearly get there but there's no mistaking it when you hear that perfect analogue crunch. Tortured, writhing sound-buzzes so crusty and mangled that they sound as if the distortion pedal has been buried underground for six months, making a solo sound like it's trying to break free from the speakers. For me, the most successful examples of this sound include Dark on their album Round The Edges, almost anything by Swedish guitarist Reine Fiske and the almighty solo towards the end of 'Hi Babe' by Zamrockers Ngozi Family. A review of this record would be amiss if I failed to commend the absolutely stonking fuzzed-up guitar solo that hits halfway through 'Hide From The Sun', the album's lead single, which surely deserves a place in this illustrious canon. Nestling stylistically in a place between Omar Khorshid and Tony Iommi, it rips mercilessly through the track's disorienting metre, and may well encourage listeners to stare into the distance with a purposeful look on their face. Fans will be glad to hear that there are plenty more of those moments to be had with this album – see the taut, fidgety funk of 'The Light Within' and the pleasantly pastoral flute on 'To Travel The Path Unknown' amongst others.Goat stand out from the rest of the contemporary psych crowd as an undeniably modern, internet-age band in that they create their own successful and popular sound by synthesising a plethora of B-musics and fringe influences made easily available through the work of labels like Finders Keepers and Sublime Frequencies. Yet Commune is so much more than record-collector rock. Album closer 'Gathering Of The Ancient Tribes', in a stylistic echo of the first track 'Talk To God' features a lattice of Malian-sounding guitars offset against heavy bass and insistent beats, before dissipating into a haze of guitar noise, organ drone and that same meddlesome temple bell. It's details like this that prove Goat are clearly concerned with more than flogging a tasteful blend of trendy influences – Commune is a truly artistic statement." - THE QUIETUS 
    $17.00
  • MY BROTHER THE WIND is an improvisational cosmic rock collective consisting of members of widely known Swedish acts Makajodama, Magnolia, Animal Daydream and most notably Anekdoten, one of the more widely recognized names in the 1990s prog rock revival.Recorded live in the studio with no overdubs during a single day in January 2013, Once There Was A Time When Time And Space Were One captures the collective's progressive soundscape qualities with incredible analogue studio production. The band utilized 6 and 12 string acoustic and electric guitars, Mellotron, flute, bass, drums, congas and more to complete the task. Expect 45 minutes of the band's most succinct material to date, recorded deep in the snowy, forested, Swedish wilderness.In 2013, MBTW expanded into an even wider fanbase, having been invited to play the mighty Roadburn Festival in Tilburg, Holland, as well as at Duna Jam in Sardinia.  At the invitation of Opeth’s Mikael Okerfeldt, guitarist Nicklas Barker returned to Roadburn to perform an improv set with Dungen guitarist Reine Fiske.Those who frequent the works of Popol Vuh, Amon Duul, Sun Ra, Träd, Gräs Och Stenar, Albert Ayler, Ash Ra Tempel, Gong, Pink Floyd and other visionary, psychedelic rock artists are advised to investigate this act. "Lush and instrumental for its duration, My Brother the Wind‘s third full-length, Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One (released by Free Electric Sound/Laser’s Edge), rolls out of the speakers much easier than its title rolls off the tongue, though both title and the work itself satisfy rhythmically. The Swedish four-piece — they now seem to be a bass-less trio with Nicklas Barker (Anekdoten) and Mathias Danielsson (Makajodama) on electric/acoustic 12-strong guitar and Daniel Fridlund Brandt on drums, but Ronny Eriksson plays bass on the album — reportedly recorded live to two-inch tape on a vintage machine, and the passion they put in bleeds readily into the nine-song/45-minute outing, fleshed with liberal splashes of Mellotron courtesy of Barker to play up a ’70s prog feel in a piece like the 12-minute “Garden of Delights.” That’s hardly the only point at which those sensibilities emerge, but even more than that, the primary vibe here is one of gorgeous heavy psych exploration, the band adventuring and feeling their way through the material as they go.On peaceful moments like the title-track, which arrives as the penultimate movement before “Epilogue” leads the way back to reality — accordingly, “Prologue” brings us in at the start — that exploration is positively serene, the 12-string complemented by spacious electric tones spreading out across vast reaches, but Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One offers more than drone and psychedelic experiments. Subtly pushed forward by Brandt‘s drums, pieces like “Into the Cosmic Halo” and even “Epilogue” enact classic space rock thrust, and even “Song of Innocence Part 1,” the first part of the journey after the backward atmospherics of “Prologue” introduce, has some cosmic feel amid its echoing solos. Its subsequent complement, “Song of Innocence Part 2,” swells to life on an even more active roll, waves of amp noise up front while drums and bass groove out behind, waiting for the guitars to catch up, which they do in a suitably glorious payoff, relatively brief but masterfully engaging, setting a momentum that continues well into “Garden of Delights,” a focal point for more than its length.Because the songs flow so well one to the next, some directly bleeding, others giving a brief pause, and because later cuts like “Thomas Mera Gartz” — named in honor of the drummer for ’70s Swedish proggers Träd, Gräs och Stenar — and the title-track have a quieter take, it’s tempting to read some narrative into the shifts of Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One, but with the material not being premeditated, I’m not sure that’s the intention so much as a signal it’s well arranged. In any case, the album offers an immersive, resonant listen, with tonal richness to spare and the presence of mind to keep a sense of motion even in its stillest parts and a balance of organic elements — Danielsson‘s recorder and Brandt‘s percussion on “Misty Mountainside,” the 12-string, etc. — amid a wash of effects and swirling psychedelia. This attention to sonic detail makes Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One more than just a collection of jams, and adds further purpose to the already worthy cause of My Brother the Wind‘s thoughtful musings, wandering and not at all lost." - The Obelisk
    $13.00
  • New digipak reissue of this recording uniting three eclectic and visionary musicians - Jonas Hellborg, Buckethead, and Michael Shrieve. Buckethead is playing acoustic guitar while Hellborg plays acoustic bass and keyboards. Shrieve plays a variety of percussion and kit. Surprisingly it's pretty agressive for what is essentially an acoustic trio.
    $17.00
  • Legit reissue of the hideously rare first album from this early German prog band.  The music is very much focused on flute and does in fact bear similarities to Jethro Tull.  The standout is the side long title track."Formed in Aachen in 1969 and initially with a keyboard player as fifth man, the band melted together blues elements, the ease of Anglo-Saxon folk, classical influences and driving guitar rock with progressive song structures into an autonomous instrumental dominated style and live programme. The titles "Hollis Brown" and "Granum Cerebri" from forthcoming third CD "Avalon And On" are from this period.In the beginning the band was not so Germany-orientated but more towards the neighbouring countries Belgium and particularly Holland and their breakthrough came accordingly in 1970 in front of a 30.000 crowd at the Jazz Festival in Bilzen (Belgium). Actually planned as a sideshow, they then played as the only amateur band next to such stars as Black Sabbath, Cat Stevens or May Blitz and were celebrated by the press as "surprise of the festival". Previously Rufus Zuphall had even appeared with Living Blues and Cuby and the Blizzards, in the same year this was followed by gigs with Curtis Jones, Group 1850 and Golden Earring.The front man on stage was the flutist Klaus Gülden. He had a decisive influence on the Rufus Zuphall sound. Bass player Helmut Lieblang wrote the lyrics. Günter Krause, a creative guitar talent, composed most of the titles and with Udo Dahmen Rufus Zuphall had a drummer, who later, after his music studies, then played with Kraan, Lake, Eberhardt Schöner and Achim Reichel and is even today much asked after. He is also studio drummer and worked as a lecturer at the Hamburg College of Music. Today he is headmaster of Mannheim College of Popular Music. Apart from Udo Dahmen, the only other one of the various Rufus Zuphall members who remained true to a musical career was Günter Krause. After Rufus Zuphall had come to a close, he too studied music, he then played jazz and jazz rock in various formations - he played into the 80s as a jazz guitarist in a sextet making records. Today he's working as a musician, composer and guitar teacher.At the beginning of December 1970, Rufus Zuphall produced live in Holland their first LP "Weiß der Teufel" in only three days. It was released in 1971 as a private pressing on Good Will Records - a masterpiece of progressive rock. The titlesong was a secret "scene hit" and the track "Spanferkel" taken from the LP became the signature tune for one of the best known German radio rock programmes. The LP, although the release was limited and despite bad marketing conditions, was a success."
    $27.00