Fool's Paradise (Vinyl)

SKU: GUESS128
Label:
Guerssen Records
Category:
Folk Rock
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Australia's duo of Madden and Harris made one of the great "one and done" albums of the 70s.  Released in 1975 it disappeared without a trace.  Its a gorgeous progressive folk album that sounds like a mash up of early King Crimson and Mellow Candle.  If you are a Mellotron freak this album is for you.  Its drenched in it and plays off the acoustic guitars beautifully.  Just a beautiful serene vibe.  Highly recommended.

"Dave Madden and Peter Harris were a teacher / pupil folk duo from Sidney who in 1975 recorded and self- released this progressive / psychedelic folk- rock masterpiece. British influenced sound with lots of mellotron, vintage keyboards, strings, drums, fuzz bursts, dreamy vocals, etc, containing an impressive 20- minute long suite which has to be heard to be believed."

Think Subway, Mellow Candle, Magna Carta, Ithaca…
First ever legit vinyl reissue
Master tape sound
Gatefold cover with corrected colour as originally intended by the artists
Repro of the original lyrics booklet
New insert with detailed liner notes

"Essentially a contemporary folk record, it displays some beautiful neo- medieval folk, explores the edges of progressive rock and folky pop rock, and even skirts Kinks like vaudevillian humour" "Sections of the album seem cut from the very same tapestry that gave the world Ireland's Tír na nÓg or the English Magna Carta" - Richard Allen

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