Fool's Paradise (Vinyl)

SKU: GUESS128
Label:
Guerssen Records
Category:
Folk Rock
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Australia's duo of Madden and Harris made one of the great "one and done" albums of the 70s.  Released in 1975 it disappeared without a trace.  Its a gorgeous progressive folk album that sounds like a mash up of early King Crimson and Mellow Candle.  If you are a Mellotron freak this album is for you.  Its drenched in it and plays off the acoustic guitars beautifully.  Just a beautiful serene vibe.  Highly recommended.

"Dave Madden and Peter Harris were a teacher / pupil folk duo from Sidney who in 1975 recorded and self- released this progressive / psychedelic folk- rock masterpiece. British influenced sound with lots of mellotron, vintage keyboards, strings, drums, fuzz bursts, dreamy vocals, etc, containing an impressive 20- minute long suite which has to be heard to be believed."

Think Subway, Mellow Candle, Magna Carta, Ithaca…
First ever legit vinyl reissue
Master tape sound
Gatefold cover with corrected colour as originally intended by the artists
Repro of the original lyrics booklet
New insert with detailed liner notes

"Essentially a contemporary folk record, it displays some beautiful neo- medieval folk, explores the edges of progressive rock and folky pop rock, and even skirts Kinks like vaudevillian humour" "Sections of the album seem cut from the very same tapestry that gave the world Ireland's Tír na nÓg or the English Magna Carta" - Richard Allen

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His vocals confident and effected in equal measure, he works quickly to establish the verse and chorus patterns, both worthy of sing-alongs, so that by the end, “Hangin’ on the Wire” feels like its earned its handclaps, and though “Into the Black” starts out more ethereal, with extended solo sections and a long instrumental introduction, the shuffle soon takes hold and it proves to be more boogie than nod.But perhaps “Into the Black” is where the band begins their subtle shift into more esoteric sonics, because as the soft strums and plucks and interplay of electric and acoustic guitars take hold on “Thirsty Moon,” the song feels neither out of place nor especially unexpected, which it very well might have if placed earlier on Revelation and Mystery. Peters’ vocal line feels a little rushed during the verse – it’s almost as though there were too many syllables to fit in the line – but the interaction of his and Eiselt’s guitars in the instrumental break and the balance between the guitar and Vedder’s drumming in the mix makes up for any such hiccups. Another chorus feels delivered more appropriately, and the progression cycles through again; solo section into chorus, solo section into chorus. And it’s not until Behrens’ highlight bass line begins “Outside Insight Blues” that it’s apparent just how much Samsara Blues Experiment put into the album’s flow. Added keys allow the guitars to go farther out into sporadic notes without sacrificing fullness of sound, but after about two and a half minutes, there’s a turn into riffier material that carries the groove through the next six. There are a few part changes, but things don’t really feel jammed out until the classic ‘70s boogie meets psychedelia of the last 90 seconds or so, blues harp and all. It’s a shift worthy of Siena Root, and the two-minute interlude “Zwei Schatten im Schatten” (in English, “Two Shadows in the Shadow”) follows suit with an appropriate marriage of Eastern and Western musical traditions with sitar and acoustic six-string. There’s something sweet and solemn in the intertwining melody, and it’s a passing thing on the way to the 12-minute closer, but worth paying attention to in a way that many interludes aren’t.Then, at last, comes the ending title cut. Worthy of its name, “Revelation and Mystery” caps the album with a sense of psychedelic majesty through which Samsara Blues Experiment show their ability to keep hold of a song no matter how deep into space they might also want to push it. The song winds. Its progression is at once driving and subdued, and of all the songs on Revelation and Mystery, it’s probably the best blend of all sides of what’s shown itself to be the band’s current sound. Of course, at 12 minutes, one could easily argue it has time to do and be all these things – with room left over for a bit of that sitar to show up as well among the guitar leads – but still, it’s another display of the maturity Samsara Blues Experiment have been able to take on in a relatively short amount of time (their demo gave first notice in 2008). Some bands need three years to learn and foster growth between their albums, and some bands need to play. If the jump between their first and second records is anything to go by, Samsara Blues Experiment would seem to be the latter. Wherever this stylistic form takes them, I don’t imagine it’ll be too long before we find out, but until then, the 47 minutes of Revelation and Mystery provide a varied and exciting listen worthy of repeat visits. Samsara Blues Experiment continue to progress, continue to impress." - The Obelisk
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