From Sand (Part 1)

SKU: 884501653923
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Private Release
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Second album from this Brazilian/American progressive metal band. The Element was assembled by Brazilian transplant Rafael Macedo who handles all the lead vocals and guitars. He's enlisted Circle II Circle bassist Mitch Stewart, former Imagika drummer Henry Moreno, as well as keyboardist Jeremy Villucci. The band's music bears the imprint of the obvious prog metal influence of Dream Theater but there is definitely an epic Pink Floyd quality to their music. Sort of like Images & Words meets The Wall. Macedo's vocals are excellent and he's quite an accomplished guitarist as well. Nice and tasteful soloing through out without turning into a nonstop shredfest - an album that seems to put melody at the forefront but with a solid foundation in musicianship. This arrives beautifully packaged in a DVD sized fold out digipak. I think this is a band we are going to hear a lot about. Highly recommended.

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