Brutal Romance

SKU: FES4010
Label:
Free Electric Sound
Category:
Fusion/Jazz
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“Crazy French phenomenon Christophe Godin applies his nothing short of bonkers rock guitar abilities to this ferocious yet tongue-in-cheek display of post-Vai/Zappa composition and musicianship. Jazzy it ain’t, but full of immense playing technique and cool tones it most definitely is. Be afraid.” – Guitarist Magazine



Brutal Romance is the fifth release from this intense French instrumental trio. Through extensive gigging in the US, this Morglbl has developed an ever expanding fanbase addicted to their crazy blend of jazz and metal. The band consists of Christophe Godin (guitars), Ivan Rougny (bass), and Aurelian Ouzoulias. All three members of the band are known around the world not just from Morglbl but as clinicians as well. Morglbl injects a dose of tongue in cheek humor into jazz rock laced with crushing power chords. They have a strong cross over appeal between fans of progressive rock, fusion, and metal. Morglbl has performed at festivals alongside Liquid Tension Experiment and Umphrey’s McGee. They have most recently toured the US as co-headliners with Sweden’s Freak Kitchen.



Fans of shred and fusion Gods like Allan Holdsworth, Steve Vai or Freak Kitchen’s Mattias Eklundh will find this essential.

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