Humanum Est (Vinyl)

SKU: LHC43
Label:
Long Hair Music
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Aera (not to be confused with the Italian band Area), were a long running German fusion band that recorded for the independent Erlkoenig label in the 70s and into the 80s.

Although the band had a very active rhythm section the real energy came between the interplay of guitarist Muck Groh, violinist Christoph Krieger, and alto/flute player Klaus Kreuzeder. Expect extended jamming that is quite reminiscent of Kraan and Embryo. Authorized vinyl edition.
 

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