Vampire State Building (Vinyl)

SKU: LHC122LP
Label:
Long Hair Music
Category:
Jazz Rock
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Rare German jazzrock originally released on the Philips label in 1971. The music of Alcatraz is based around Klaus Nagurski's flute/alto sax trading off with the fuzz distorted guitarwork of Klaus Holst. Long jamming tracks remind me more of Traffic than "Miles Davis meets Deep Purple" as purported by the label. A great one either way.  Higly Recommended.

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  • First time on CD for the complete two part debut from this German acid psych trio.  The band is lead by guitarist Sula Bassana who you may know for his incredible solo albums.  The rhythm section is held down by Komet Lulu on bass and Pablo Carneval on drums.  Long psychedelic guitar driven space explorations that goes down the same road as the first Ash Ra Tempel and early Pink Floyd masterpieces.  The CD seet was mastered by Eroc of Grobschnitt fame so you know he gets it.  I'm getting high just typing this description!  Highly recommended.
    $21.00
  • In Hoc Signo is the blowtorch debut from this Italian band playing in the "Rock Progressivo Italiano" style.  Its a young band based out of Rome.  Their goal was to use vintage sounds and replicate the sounds of the 70s and they do it in spades.  Mellotron M400, Hammond B3 Organ, Mini Moog Voyager, Electric Piano, Elka Synthex - all the good keyboard stuff that will send chills down your spine.  Killer lead licks on violin and guitar fight for space with the keys.  I'm reminded of Quella Vecchia Locanda, PFM, King Crimson and Le Orme!  If this isn't enough the band added a couple of guests: Anglagard's Mattias Olsson plays on a track and helped with arrangements.  The legendary David Jackson plays sax and flute.  This one kills and it kills and it doesn't stop killing.  BUY OR DIE!
    $16.00
  • 2LP 180 gram vinyl is a gatefold sleeve."When Mark Trueack announced the break-up of Unitopia, the feeling was like that of losing a close friend or family member. But Mark Trueack, (Truey), has been working on many projects at the same time. The United Progressive Fraternity evolved from the collaborations of some of Truey's favorite artists on a solo album yet to be released. The project took over Truey's consciousness to the point that he temporarily put aside the solo album to help assemble this cast of creative and innovative artists. Like a fraternity, this is no young bunch of artists trying to find their way. These are seasoned and experienced artists from some of prog rock's premier bands. The "fraternity" includes honorary members Jon Anderson and Steve Hackett amidst a cast of "Who's Who" in modern prog rock. The wonderful thing about the fraternity is that it will expand and grow over time to include some excellent surprise contributors in the future.But that is the future…let's talk about the present and their debut, Fall in Love with the World.The United Progressive Fraternity, for this debut album include some familiar names like Matt Williams, guitar; Dave Hopgood, on drums; Tim Irrgang, on percussion and Mark Trueack, on vocals; all from the band Unitopia. The Fraternity also includes original members: song-writer Guy Manning, (Manning and The Tangent), on vocals and keyboards; Daniel Mash, (Maschine, The Tangent), on bass guitar; Marek Arnold, (Seven Steps to the Green Door), on wind and keys; and Steve Unruh, on violin and flute. Honorary members include Jon Anderson, formerly the voice of the rock legend Yes: and Steve Hackett, on guitar, formerly the exquisite and innovative guitar sounds of the rock legend Genesis. Claire Vezina, also brings her beautiful vocals to the project.To open the album, what better way than with an overture? And "We Only Get One World" is full of sounds of voices from around the world mixed well with intricate and exquisite percussion, soft acoustic guitar and sounds from throughout the world all surrounded by a powerful heartbeat of drums. Like the opening of a classic Disney movie or a symphony of the world it welcomes you to the fraternity. The four minute overture sets the table well for the feast to come."Choices" introduces the theme of the album: protect the Earth, before it's too late. The opening classic radio excerpts that Unitopia has been famous for adding to the opening of its tracks is back. They are really a great way to introduce a song and Truey always selects an interesting and diverse spectrum of excerpts that fit so well. I think this might have been one of his best.Then Truey sings, "Choices make the world go round". Yes of course. But the world music surrounding this peace and the eerie stillness of the sound just force us to contemplate our future and meaning of life on the planet even deeper. That underlying Squire - like chunk of bass Daniel Mash is playing has an awesome King Crimson/Yes quality that adds that special touch to the track. Williams guitar is inspired and the solo sax from Marek Arnold is a fortunate treat.Hopgood, on drums and Arnold on clarinet open the third track, "Intersection" with a cool jazzy spirit. Then Truey returns with powerful vocals, "Hello will you stand in my way. Do you fall?" Do we ascend or fall? A very good question. Truey's warning reminds us of the choice we still have if we choose to exercise it. The keyboards, guitar and sax soloing are excellent. This music reminds me of the intricacy and the powerful design Unitopia used to create such a powerful mix of jazz and progressive rock elements. Irrgang's percussion tingles the ears."The Water" is one of the album's powerhouse highlights. Imagine getting to sing with your idol. Well Truey has always been a Jon Anderson on vocals, Yes fan; like many of us. This time he gets to sing with Jon about something that both artists feel strongly about in the world. The drying of the Earth. A powerful driving force uniting two powerful vocal talents...and members of the progressive fraternity…by coincidence. Williams guitar is innovative and a driving force throughout the production."Don't Look Back", is loosely based on a story Truey told me about an adventure that occurred to Unitopia accidently on their first tour in Europe. It was a wrong left turn that could have had disastrous effects on one of the first shows of that tour. But as Truey sings in the refrain, "Don't look back…no left turn". You can, as Truey sings, "shout with frustration, it's only direction I seek, in another world where no one understands the language I speak". Any world traveler or adventurer has felt the frustration. But the metaphor can mean oh so much more to one's life. Matthew's guitar and Arnold's clarinet add that perfect old world charm as Hopgood's heartbeat drums and Mash's bass help mimic Truey's heartbeat during the ordeal. Excellent work."Travelling Man (The Story of ESHU)" is my favorite track on the album. It is full of a worldwide sound of music and plenty of deep thinking. The story goes far back in time, beyond the famous "Crossroads" sung about by the famous blues singers of the American South. I will not spoil the story. After all you can Google it these days. But listen to the music as you are listening to Truey sing. The assemblage of music on this epic long track is full of the expanse of time and world cultures brought together by this fraternity of progressive artists. Along with Steve Unruh's flute you can hear one of my other favorite highlights of the album Steve Hackett's guitar soloing. That guitar is instantly recognizable. Unruh's violin helps add to the world celebration of this album. As Mark sings, "When will we all re-unite!" Manning's keyboard interlude just before Matt Williams rocking guitar solo is yet another highlight. Steve Unruh's violin solo immediately conjures memories of Charley Daniel's fiddle duel on "The Devil Went Down to Georgia". Everything you can imagine from an epic and more. The wonderful slow guitar solo that accompanies Truey at the end will bring tears almost as full as the ending of Unitopia's "Garden". I will not spoil it by providing the lyrics here. With Claire Vezina accompanying him it helps close one of the best songs of the year."Fall in Love with the World" opens with this strange poem by a guest narrator. It is actually yours truly. Yes, Truey invited me to write a short intro poem for the title track. Which was quite an honor. Thanks Truey. The title track is yet another classic highlight of what will truly be the group debut album of the year. This song sums up the weight and power of the message of this album. Enjoy life and this Earth to the best of your ability, but don't take what you don't need, and take good care of what has been given. Williams guitar and Truey's vocals rise to the usually strong levels we all remember from Unitopia. The refrain is perfect, "Fall in love with the world. The world needs to fall in love". It will have you singing along."Religion of War" closes the album with yet another powerful lyrical track asking us why faith must always be linked to violence. It is a powerful piece of music as well. Manning's innovative keyboard creations open the track with Truey singing, and Matt Williams and Daniel Mash providing their own guitar innovations. Hopgood's heartbeat drums keep great pace. Truey sings poignantly "It's not what your maker had in mind".All of the news out of the Middle East and around the globe is a reminder that these battles continue unending. Like a wink back to Genesis' "Blood on the Rooftops", the news continues to distract us from what we were meant to do here on Earth.If you order the deluxe edition, you will receive an extended version of "The Water" which is well worth the price. More orchestration and more of Matt Williams' excellent acoustic guitar work at the opening along with powerful vocal statements from Truey and Jon will complete this collection.Ed Unitsky's artwork is over the rainbow great. Ed simply is one of the best artistic interpreters of music on this planet and he outdid himself this time.Don't miss this innovative and complete debut for this globally expressive band. For fans that were worried about the breakup of Unitopia…there is no need to worry anymore.You are part of the fraternity. The fraternity of the world which we all belong to and are meant to enjoy. This is a truly extraordinary debut for a band that will be making major strides in the future." - Sea Of Tranquility
    $20.00
  • Second album from the Swedish quartet of Nicklas Barker (Anekdoten), Mathias Danielsson (Makajodama), Ronny Eriksson, and Tomas Eriksson. Like their first album, I Wash My Soul In The Stream Of Infinity is pure psychedelic bliss. The songs have their roots in jam sessions. Overall there is a very German underground/krautrock feel. These long jams vary in tempo - from the buzz saw opener "Fire! Fire!" on through the blissed out Yatha Sidhra-like acoustic "Pagan Moonbeam". Lethal guitar leads augmented by dollops of Mellotron and organ are the order of the day. All served up with phat analogue sound. If its possible to get high from a round aluminum disc this is the one that will do it for you. Highly recommended to those you seek to explore the innermost nooks and crannies of their brain.
    $15.00
  • BluRay containing a full live footage (filmed in Cologne), “Behind The Scenes” of the Kaldeidoscope World Tour 2014, band interviews and 3 further live tracks (filmed in Tilburg)Tracklisting BluRay: Live in CologneInto The Blue (26:12)My New World (17:29)Shine (07:22)The Whirlwind Medley (29:34)Beyond The Sun (04:24)Kaleidoscope (31:30)Neal & Roine Duet (03:41)We All Need Some Light (05:56)Black As The Sky (08:43)Encore:Medley: All Of The Above / Stranger In Your Soul (26:06)Bonus Material:(A behind the scenes look at: Kaleidoscope World Tour 2014)2. Band Interviews (22:31)3. Bonus Live Performances:3.1. Nights In White Satin (Live in Tilburg) (07:46)3.2. Sylvia (with Thijs van Leer - Live in Tilburg) (03:46)3.3. Hocus Pocus (with Thijs van Leer - Live in Tilburg) (07:53)Additional extra: Mike Portnoy vs Neal Morse in "Name That Beatles Tune"
    $16.00
  • his is one of their best releases. It was primarily composed by the band's keyboardist Jukka Gustavson. The jazzy undercurrents evoke a suble Canterbury/Caravan feel but some of vocal stylings of Pembroke and Gustavson remind one of Peter Gabriel on Selling England By The Pound."Considered by many as Wigwam's most ambitious work, Being was originally released in 1974. The album was partially remixed and remastered in 2001, and this latter version is considered superior by the group's mastermind behind the album concept, Jukka Gustavson.When we at Svart began planning the Being reissue, we were faced with the problem of whether to base the vinyl on the original version or the 2001 version, both somewhat different from each other. Eventually we decided to expand the album to a double vinyl, with the 1st LP being as close to the 1974 version as possible, and the 2nd LP presenting the 2001 edition on vinyl for the first time.The original vinyl release featured two booklets, one in English and the other in Finnish. Our version has the contents of both + unreleased photos + a new interview with Jukka Gustavson in one massive booklet."
    $28.00
  • Exile is the long awaited third album from this British progmetal band.  To-Mera is fronted by Julie Kiss with the principal songwriting coming from guitarist (and her husband) Tom MacLean.  Some of you may recognize Tom's name from his membership in Haken as their bassist.  It gets slightly more confusing as Haken's main composer/guitarist/keyboardist is To-Mera's keyboardist Richard "Hen" Henshall.  Yes life can get complicated sometimes.The new album is a conceptual work about human existence.  Ms. Kiss' vocals flow like a constant river over some real bad ass and complex prog metal.  At times MacLean breaks out some incredible fusion leads taking the band in a whole different direction.  Hen's keys have a very specific sound.  At times you will be reminded for a moment of the Haken sound but in general this doesn't sound like a Haken album.  The album does feature some special guests...Marcela Bovio (Stream Of Passion), Stefan Forte (Adagio), and Ray Hearne (Haken) all make appearances.  An intricate and involving listen, this is easily going to be one of 2012's best metal releases.  Highly recommended.
    $14.00
  • 2LP 180g vinyl in a gatefold sleeve."It’s been quite a past few years for the incredible Anathema. Honors have been bestowed upon them, they’ve released an instant classic album in “Weather Systems”, and last year they released one of the best live concert films I’ve ever seen, “Universal”. Anathema is on top of the world, and they are only getting bigger. With all of this on their shoulders, they approach the world once again with their new album, “Distant Satellites”, a fitting name for a massive album. Again, with all of their recent success creating huge expectations, can this band meet such critical reception? Needless to say, Vincent Cavanagh on vocals, Danny Cavanagh on guitar, Jamie Cavanagh on bass, John Douglas on percussion, Daniel Cardoso on drums, and Lee Douglas with her wonderful vocals were all up to the challenge.“Distant Satellites” is a very different album from “Weather Systems”, or anything else they’ve done, for that matter. It is different, yet somehow instantly familiar. It includes everything that makes them Anathema, but adds new and exciting elements to their already excellent formula. If you’ve never heard Anathema, their formula (in their last few albums, anyways) includes soaring guitars, amazingly catchy melodies, spiritual lyrics, and emotional flow both vocally and structurally. They are the masters of melody, and they remain complex and progressive even while being simple and accessible. They are truly masters of their craft.This new album, then, is no different in those terms. The melodies return in force, such as the serene beauty of “The Lost Song” parts 1-3. And, yet, there is something different here. The melodic lines are somewhat more complex, less in-your-face, and more organic. This especially shows in the song lengths, most of them being over five minutes. This allows for more growth and more progression. Indeed, then, the melodies on “Distant Satellites”, while not being as instantly lovable or recognizable, are certainly more difficult and possibly will have a longer “shelf life” in my mind. Yes, the orchestrations seem to be lower key, as well, allowing the vocalists to express themselves more personally then ever.There are other improvements, too. I feel that the musicianship is more fervent and on a higher plateau of difficulty than Anathema has tried. Drummer John Douglas, especially, plays amazingly well from start to finish, accenting the music with awesome pounding and fills. The rest of the band are at their peak, too, with Vincent and Lee being especially great with emotional and meaningful vocal performances.“Distant Satellites” is different in more meaningful ways, too. Utilizing post-rock/metal structures is nothing new for Anathema, but they really do perfect them here, as on “Dusk”, a dark, climactic song. Yet, there is a sense of continuity between tracks, too. This is obviously the case between the three parts of “The Lost Song”, but it’s also apparent throughout the album, as if Anathema is telling us a story, convincing us of our true selves and our connection with the universe and with each other.This album is wonderful in the first half, but my excitement reached new heights in the second half. Anathema has taken it upon themselves to change things up a bit. They wanted to progress their sound, but make it all seem so natural. So, in the second half, the album climaxes with one of the best songs, simply called “Anathema”. But then, we are thrown for a loop somewhat, as “You’re Not Alone” features a hefty portion of electronic vibe. It’s great, but the best is still to come.Next, “Firelight”, a darkly ethereal instrumental track that is completely electronic, is thrust upon us, and is followed up by what may possibly be the best song Anathema has ever produced, “Distant Satellites”. This track combines everything that has ever made Anathema great: soaring melodies, climactic structure, gentle spirituality, amazing vocals, and now an electronic beat that is both complex and catchy. Vibrant, mesmerizing, and pure, this track elates me every time I hear it. It takes this album, and my heart, to new heights. The album finishes with a gentle ballad that just seems so fitting, yet it still has the strong electronic influence.So, is “Distant Satellites” a winner? In every way! Is it their best album? I don’t know; it has the potential, but it might take time, just like “Weather Systems” did. What I can tell you is that this new album is more mature, more progressive, more interesting and eclectic, and less formulaic then anything Anathema has crafted yet. It does sacrifice some accessibility and some instant likability for these things, but I respect their decision massively, and I fully expect to see “Distant Satellites” at the tops of many lists at the end of 2014." - Progulator
    $30.00
  • First time on CD! Guru Guru made two excellent albums during their brief stay on Atlantic Records of which this is the first (Dance Of The Flames is the second). It is also the last album to feature original guitarist Ax Genrich. Although you can expect craziness and the usual sick playing, there is actually a bit of refinement to their sound - as though they are playing with a bit more control and restraint. Easily one of their best efforts and highly recommended. This gorgeous digipak edition features a bonus CD - a concert recorded on 9/15/73 at the German Rock Festival. Although sourced from an audience cassette, it's a previously unavailable taste of the band in a live setting - which is where the band really excelled.
    $12.00
  • "Death.Taxes.Ozric Tentacles.Since 1984 this loose collective have been releasing reliably great music from the mind of leader Ed Wynne. Their margin of error is enviably tiny – there is no such thing as a bad Ozrics album. Sure, some are better than others, but the body of work is as inescapably consistent as mortality and societal contributions. Technicians of the Sacred is their fifteenth studio album, second double album and the first release in this format since Erpland in 1990. It is also one of the best they have ever recorded.The blend of electronica and inner-space rock is instantly recognisable with ‘The High Pass’. World music and gently undulating synths take their time to ease us back into the required frame of cosmic consciousness. It takes almost 6 minutes for the secret weapon, Wynne’s signature lysergic lead guitar, to be deployed and that is the modus operandi of the whole album – nothing is rushed, each track unfolds lotus-like.‘Changa Masala’ distils all the band’s ingredients into a spicy side-dish. Sequencers, vocal samples and a reggae skank provide the base while acoustic guitar rips like a John McLaughlin solo, interjecting a nod to their past, a musical in-joke for the fans, which I won’t spoil for those who haven’t yet heard it.The Steve Hillage (Gong, System 7 and sometime Ozrics collaborator) influence is foregrounded in the first disc’s closer, ‘Switchback’. Tap-delay guitar slithers over a web of ambient keyboard washes. Portamento bass notes slide and glide their way through the patchouli-scented psychedelic haze.f the first disc was an aromatic treat, then the second is manna. ‘Epiphlioy’ recalls the classic ‘Saucers’. Its serpentine twelve-string acoustic riffs employ Eastern modes to evoke a scene that is paradoxically earthy and otherworldly. Staccato strings conjure Kashmir while a celestial orchestra of whooshing keyboard pads threatens to levitate us into the stratosphere and beyond. We are back in the bizarre bazaar, folks. Brandi Wynne pins down the ethereal mix with a heavy dub bassline. The track changes constantly. This is the most compositionally complex music the band has ever produced.While there are references to Ozric history and a more organic feel similar to early classics with the occasional use of non-electric instruments and ethnic voices, the album as a whole is a step forward. The painstakingly crafted symbiosis of synthesised sounds and rock instrumentation, coupled with a slick production, lend Technicians of the Sacred a holistic integrity not heard since Jurassic Shift (which incidentally entered the UK charts at a very respectable number 11 in 1993). The whole gels together and flows with the multi-layered sophistication of a symphony while retaining some of the jam-band aesthetic of the free festival days.‘Smiling Potion’ features interlocking sequences even Tangerine Dream would be proud of and a tribal metronome-sense beat straight out of Peter Gabriel’s soundtrack for The Last Temptation of Christ.As ‘Rubbing Shoulders With The Absolute’ throbs along on a blissed-out dub rhythm artificially generated voices ensure the weirdness meter is kept firmly in the red.Hungarian drummer Balázs Szende makes his first studio appearance and throughout the album he proves to be a superb addition to the group, whether approximating the tight programmed style of The Hidden Step era or, as on the closing track, ‘Zenlike Creature’, tackling elusive prog time signatures with ease and finesse. As Ed Wynne winds up a solo worthy of fusion maestros Mahavishnu Orchestra he introduces a shimmering Hillage-esque repeating motif that stays in the mind long after the music has stopped.Technicians of the Sacred, for all its dynamic shifts and intricacies, is a very chilled-out release, one for relaxing to and for transportation to the other, wherever that may be. There are no jarring wig-out rock guitar hero sections or all-out sonic attacks like ‘The Throbbe’. Rather this is Ozric Tentacles’ most cohesive and accomplished effort in almost 20 years and a highlight of a long and peerless career." - Echoes And Dust
    $13.00
  • Yet another brilliant work from this Norwegian prog band.  The Greatest Show On Earth is the band's third effort.  While the first album Identity delved into alternative/prog realms bearing similarity to Radiohead, their second album All Rights Removed was full on Pink Floyd worship.  This latest effort carries on in similar fashion.  There are parts of the album that were written with tracing paper.  It evokes the mood and feel of Dark Side Of The Moon, Wish You Were Here, and maybe even a bit of The Wall.  This isn't to say the band doesn't inject any personality of their own - they do.  There are contemporary elements, its just that when they go into full on Pink Floyd mode its so apparent and so well executed that it blinds you to everything else that is going on.  What Bi Kyon Ran is to King Crimson or The Watch is to Genesis, Airbag is to Pink Floyd.  Original?  Truth be told not really.  It doesn't matter, its so well executed that you will just immerse yourself in the listening experience.  Highly recommended.
    $17.00
  • Its been quite a long time since we've heard from Magic Pie.  They went through lots of trials and tribulations getting this album finished but now its finally arrived.  If you are not familiar with this band here's the deal: Magic Pie are a Norwegian band with a retro 70s sound.  The music is a bit of a high wire act balancing the neo-prog sounds of The Flower Kings with the heavier elements of classic Uriah Heep.  They also seem to be the darlings of Rosfest having played there multiple times."It's hard to believe it's been 10 years since these proggers from Norway released their promising debut "Motions of Desire". At that time, their music struck me as an enthusiastic combination of classic prog and classic hard rock. (Think Deep Purple for the hard rock side of that equation.) At their best, they offered memorable passages and pieces that sounded like they very well could have been long lost recordings from many years ago. At their worst, they sometimes fell short of filling the big shoes of the legendary bands whose music they strove to emulate. That's actually not bad for a debut album from a new prog band. I found much to like and looked forward to hearing from them again in the future.Checking back in on them a decade later, I must say that I am very impressed with how they have developed and matured. No longer do I get the feeling that certain sections of songs are direct homages to any particular band from any one particular decade of prog's illustrious history. Their influences, while still very present and valid, are now more varied, including a greater percentage of modern reference points. More importantly, their influences are just that--merely influences rather than templates or even primary reference points.The sound quality on "King for a Day" is superb thanks in large part to the enlistment of sonic genius Rich Mouser (whose resume includes similar work for prominent contemporaries like Spock's Beard, Transatlantic and Dream Theater).Keyboardist Erling Hananger is an excellent addition to Magic Pie's recipe. His keyboard parts are expressive, dynamic and integral to the music. When appropriate, his leads seamlessly blend, harmonize, and work synergistically with electric guitar.The lyrics have a melodramatic and somewhat tragic flair this time around, but this is prog so you should be accustomed to the musical ride including a few tragic tales from time to time by now, right?OK ' so it's time for the "magic" question... A decade after their debut album, how has my impression of Magic Pie changed?On "King for a Day", I now hear a band which has found "its own voice", one that resonates confidently in the space somewhere between classic arena rock of yesteryear (on prog-steroids of course) and modern melodic prog of the 21st Century (like Spock's Beard and The Flower Kings). Add a few dashes of modern prog-metal to taste and you, my friend, have baked up a very nice confection indeed... MAGIC PIE!If you love modern prog anthems with big harmonies and 'sing along' choruses, give "King for a Day" a listen! I'm glad I did!" - ProgArchives
    $15.00
  • Setna is a superb French ensemble whose style of progressive rock firmly falls within the zeuhl framework.  Their 2007 debut was a bit controversial.  There was quite a bit of anticipation for the release as fans of the genre were anticipating a full on Magma assault.  What they got was something that smoldered and didn't explode but it did so consistently.  So for some fans their expectations fell short.  For more wide eared listeners they recognized a band that was influenced by Magma but didn't slavishly imitate them.Guerison is the follow up and finds them stretching out a little bit more.  Magma is still the prime influence but there are equal influences from the Canterbury sphere.  The band employs a dual keyboardist configuration.  Florent Gac's overdriven organ will definitely remind you of David Sinclair.  There are some Mellotron bits scattered about and among the many guest musicians you will find Magma alumnus Benoit Widemann on Mini-Moog.Outstanding stuff.  Highly recommended.
    $16.00
  • New edition of the third album from this great Italian band - their last in their purely progmetal phase. Oleg Smirnoff comes up with killer keyboard lines through out but it's the vocals of Terrence Holler that sets this band apart. Perhaps their best effort, now augmented in this new remastered edition with 6 bonus tracks and a poster. Highly recommended.
    $12.00