The Road Of Bones

SKU: GEPCD1046
Label:
Giant Electric Pea
Category:
Progressive Rock
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IQ's 10th studio arrives and again with a slightly reconfigured lineup.  The exceptionally gifted Neil Durant, previously with Sphere3, is now handling keyboards.  Nothing dramatic changed.  If anything keyboards might even be a bit more prominent.  Paul Cook and Tim Esau, the original rhythm section, are now in tow. Peter Nicholls is his sombre self.  Guitars seem to be slightly heavier but all in all this sounds like prime IQ.  This is a band that has weathered personnel changes over the year but like a fine wine they've improved with age.  This is a BUY OR DIE release.  Top 10 for 2014.

 

Product Review

Steampunk
Mon, 2014-05-05 09:40
Rate: 
0
IQ's The Road of Bones has quickly become one of my favorite releases of 2014. This is not for the faint of heart. It is anger. It is melancholy. It is darkness trapped in a polycarbonate prison. Don't shortchange yourself by getting the single cd release. Most bonus discs are full of studio artifacts & detritus - material that wasn't good enough to make the cut - this isn't the case with The Road of Bones.
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Product Review

Steampunk
Mon, 2014-05-05 09:40
Rate: 
0
IQ's The Road of Bones has quickly become one of my favorite releases of 2014. This is not for the faint of heart. It is anger. It is melancholy. It is darkness trapped in a polycarbonate prison. Don't shortchange yourself by getting the single cd release. Most bonus discs are full of studio artifacts & detritus - material that wasn't good enough to make the cut - this isn't the case with The Road of Bones.
You must login or register to post reviews.
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