Void

SKU: MR023
Label:
Maracash
Category:
Progressive Rock
Add to wishlist 

The Red Zen is an instrumental quartet from Italy. Imagine a fusion album recorded by a progressive rock band. While their label tries to position them as a band in the style of Mahavishnu Orchestra and Return To Forever, they really are more of a straight ahead prog band. Guitarist Ettore Salati was formerly with The Watch. While he doesn't sound like Steve Hackett here, he certainly plays with far more distortion than you are likely to ever hear from a fusion guitarist. No - this isn't really fusion. Its really well done instrumental prog rock with some killer soloing coming from keyboards and guitar. This owes more to Djam Karet or Helmet Of Gnats than any fusion band I can think of. Highly recommended.

There are no review yet. Be the first!

Product Review

You must login or register to post reviews.
Laser Pic

customers also bought

SEE ALL
  • Double CD live recording of the hot trio of Brian Beller, Marco Minnemann, and Guthrie Gvan.  Recorded at the Alvas Showroom on June 2nd and 3rd, 2012.
    $18.00
  • I've known keyboardist Dan Pluta for a very, very long time.  I never actually got to hear him play but one evening in Pennsylvania, his quartet Carpe Nota opened a gig for Knight Area.  In this age of sampling it was refreshing to see Dan's rig - he had keyboards stacked up to the heavens and damn if he didn't play the beejezus out of them!  I was impressed to say the least.So what's Carpe Nota all about?  The are an instrumental quartet with strong roots in 70s progressive rock.  Guitarist Peter Rubinetti has a vintage sound that fits the music perfectly.  Dan is a very dexterious keyboardist.  He is clearly influenced by all the greats - Wakeman, Simonetti, and Emerson while doing his own bombastic thing.  You get serious back and forth interplay between keys and guitar.  The rhythm section of Ken Sundling and Peter Derenbecher essentially hold down the fort and get out of the way for Pluta and Rubinetti to do their high energy thing.  Knowing Dan's passion for progressive music of all kinds, it's refreshing to hear the gestation of it after all these years.  Its reflected in his music - a trip back to old school prog with the occasional contemporary flash.  If you dig the classic bands you need to check out Carpe Nota.
    $11.00
  • This is the release that kicked it off for the Finnish band.  A thirty-five minute release that seamlessly marries Scandinavian folk music with Ozric Tentacles influence space rock."This amazing space rock band from Finland has captured the attention of fans of the genre around the world, and even those who usually aren't that interested in it. Who would have thought the next band in the line of Gong and Ozric Tentacles would come from Finland? Well, why not?Purely instrumental excursions into psychedelic spaces, propelled by Tim Blake-like droning and burbling synths, Hillage-like guitar glisandos and arpeggios, pulsating bass lines, phasing sitars, and precise drumming with some occasional Ian Anderson-ish (vocalizing and blowing simultaneously) flute work to spice things up. They're like Gong without jazzy influences or vocals, and like the Ozrics without techno influences. Just pure, hypnotic, unadulterated space rock to float past the rings of Saturn with ... my favorite kind of prog." - New Gibraltar Encyclopedia Of Progressive Rock
    $13.00
  • With Jean Luc Ponty out and Stu Goldberg replacing Gayle Moran, McLaughlin came up with the weakest lineup and album to carry the Mahavishnu moniker. Universally hated.
    $12.00
  • Record label hype: "Diagramma, the second full-length CD release by The Rebel Wheel, is dark, atmospheric and dense; a complex slice of modern progressive rock that never sacrifices melody while sustaining unrelenting waves of mounting tension and euphoric release. Angular twists and riffs morph into ambient soundscapes with soft, emotional vocals seamlessly binding the diverse elements together. Owing as much to modern influences as progressive legends of the past, The Rebel Wheel’s sound on Diagramma is unique and urgent, blending cutting-edge production techniques with diverse musicality and technical precision, often with a touch of fusion. The official 10T Records release of Diagramma contains a total of seven tracks, totaling over an hour of music, with the largest piece (the 21 minute epic "Diagramma Suite”) in the middle, acting as the fulcrum. Diagramma features tracks that alternate between hard-edged vocal tunes, and instrumentals that range from the quiet pastoral 12-string of "Three Valley Gap,” to the hard-edged fusion of "Tempra.” The CD comes in a deluxe digipak."
    $12.00
  • Hot fusion album recorded by this legendary British guitarist probably more known for his session work than anything else although he did have some great bands like The Running Man and Mouse. Cuneiform Records signed Russell for his long awaited new solo album and here is what they had to say: "Like contemporaries Sonny Sharrock and Terje Rypdal, Russell makes it sound as if the guitar is not enough, as if he's reaching for something wilder, something that can't be contained within the 6 string cage"-Jim O'Rourke. Guitarist Ray Russell has been a professional musician since he was 15 and he joined the John Barry Seven (famous for their James Bond soundtracks). Not hugely known to the general public, for over four decades he has worked with artists as diverse as Nucleus, Gil Evans, Van Morrison, Cat Stevens, Bill Fay, Jack Bruce, Michael Gibbs, Tina Turner, Bryan Ferry and many, many others. His wide-ranging solo career got into gear during the late 60s and can be viewed as a simultaneous and wilder variant of the same path towards electric jazz that Miles Davis and others took during this time, releasing a number of very collectable and ahead of their time albums, and becoming one of the earliest truly 'out' guitarists of the late 60s in the process. Goodbye Svengali is influenced by and dedicated to visionary jazz arranger Gil Evans, and includes one of Gil's final recordings. It is an album that mixes dark fusion, lyrical guitar pieces and icy soundscapes. Ray's playing style can be compared to such great players as Sonny and Terje, as Jim noted, but also to John McLaughlin, John Abercrombie and Jeff Beck! Includes performances by noted U.K. fusion/rock players such as Mo Foster, Gary Husband, Tony Hymas, Simon Phillips and others." HUZZAH!!
    $13.00
  • The madcap French jazz metal trio return with their sixth album.  Morglbl consists of guitarist Christope Godin, bassist Ivan Rougny, and drummer  Aurelian Ouzoulias.  The band has toured extensively around the world – USA, Europe, Russia and even China!  They have shared the stage with Liquid Tension Experiment, Bumblefoot, and Umphrey’s McGee among others.These three virtuosos are also well endorsed clinicians and have developed a following individually but when they come together the fireworks really start.  Tea Time For Punks doesn’t deviate from the tried and true Morglbl formula.  Take equal parts fusion and crushing metal power chords, then inject a healthy dose of tongue in cheek humor and you’ve got the perfect Morglbl album. The band is often described as Primus meets Steve Vai and Allan Holdsworth, with flavors of Frank Zappa! 
    $13.00
  • Fifth album from this German instrumental psych/stoner band is a real mind crusher.  You like My Brother The Wind?  You need to hear this.  If Samsara Blues Experiment recorded an instrumental album it might sound something like this.  The album is interspersed with quieter introspective interludes that just seem to made the heavier parts heavier and the spacier parts trippier.  If you like your psych served up hard you can't pass it up.  Devastating stuff.  BUY OR DIE!BTW - the angry metal guy tells it way better than I can:"It was difficult for me to turn down a promo so intertwined with one of the subjects of my recently-completed dissertation. Aldous Huxley‘s migration to Eastern philosophy, influenced by both Taoism and Buddhism, is well documented in his final novel, Island. The inhabitants of the idyllic island practice such spiritual, philosophical models, culminating in the consumption of so-called “Moksha-medicine,” a hallucinogen which permits heightened awareness and understanding. The band which explores similarly Zen and reflective topics is one to catch my eye and I excitedly embarked on this quest for internal liberation.Moksha is the fifth full-length by Germany’s My Sleeping Karma, succeeding their previous release Soma (also a reference to Eastern spirituality and prominently interpreted in Huxley’s Brave New World). It accordingly incorporates Eastern instrumentation in a groovy, psychedelic exploration of exactly how mellow one can be while the music can still be interpreted as metal. Though it could be described as relaxing mood music, the distorted guitars and surprising technical proficiency of the band grounds Moksha in the space between rock and metal (and also qualifies it for AMG, you goddamned haters).If Kraut or psychedelic rock is your jam then you will assuredly find plenty to enjoy here. The minimalist approach with sparingly-used instruments and catchy but repetitive leads will worm its way into your skull. There aren’t multiple riffs throughout each song; rather, a core motif which gradually progresses and develops throughout, lending a charming coherency to the album – see opener “Prithvi” for this. Occasional synths and piano keys afford an ethereal air too. However, it’s the points at which more overt Eastern instrumentation is used that the material really stands out. The five “Interlude”s which split each of the main songs strongly evoke My Brother The Wind, with groovy bass-lines and the interesting use of monk’s chants and hand-operated drums. The album’s concept is thus drawn into the music and it creates a quite captivating effect. The sudden and disturbing emanation of pop shite from one of my housemates’s bedrooms drew me from my trance and alerted me to how involving the material is.Despite the repetitive and seemingly improvised nature of the music, its technicality is another boon. As the songs progress and layer, the guitars and drums can become quite intense despite the over-arching serenity (I’m aware this sounds like a contradiction but it’s a testament to the subtle song-writing). The nifty transition at 2:30 of “Akasha” foregrounds a sound very similar to mid-era Anathema, and the transition at 4:00 demonstrates the talent of the bassist and drummer, leading into an appropriately-climatic harmony. This is just one song, but jazzy drum fills and strong bass work permeate the entirety of the release. The Floydian jam on “Interlude 5” is compelling too.I would argue that Moksha effectively achieves its goal and nails the style it strives for. However, I do feel that it may be too niche for some listeners – it’s easy for me to concertedly listen for the technical accomplishments as a reviewer, but the music can slip to the background into the realms of mood music. Though a pleasant listen it may be, one could argue it’s a little safe and it certainly doesn’t arouse my passions sufficiently to push my score to excellent. Furthermore, each of the main tracks can sound quite similar if not explicitly listening – that said, the interludes split up the record nicely so this effect is mitigated. I’m also part of the niche rock and metal market that appreciates the spiritual subject matter, if only on an academic level.Turning my gaze to the empirical and away from the spiritual, the solid dynamics certainly aid affairs. The principle tracks hit a DR score of 8, with the “Interlude”s varying between 10 and 14. There is good breathing room for each instrument and each is clean without being over-produced. A holistic sound is achieved which envelops the listener well.I imagine there is quite a specific demographic that this music hits so it may not be for everyone, but I’m enjoying my journey to the geographic heights of Nepal, the enigmatic Sadhus of India and through the tenets of Yin Yang. The ultimate dearth of diversity and Moksha‘s intrinsic tranquility limits my true passion for the record, but it’s a worthwhile investment nonetheless. Aldous would be proud." - The Angry Metal Guy
    $13.00
  • Second studio album from what may be the ultimate chops band.  Guthrie Govan (guitars), Bryan Beller (bass), and Marco Minnemann (drums) turn it up an notch further.  Everything is set to 11 on this one. Lots of notes flying around and different styles as well - on "Louisville Stomp: I'm hearing some cool country style pickin' from Guthrie Govan that is welcome and unexpected.  He sounds like the second coming of Danny Gatton.  Other tracks are a non-stop shredfest - that's what the Aristocrats are all about.  Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • New mini-LP sleeve edition of the long out of print solo album from guitarist from Holding Pattern. Originally released in 1993 after the breakup of Holding Pattern, Tony Spada worked with some of the musicians from the band to create a high energy mix of progressive rock and fusion that sometimes...sounded quite a bit like The Dregs. A pretty slamming affair well worth revisiting.
    $13.00
  • Remastered edition."After two exemplary releases, Traffic released Shoot Out at the Fantasy Factory, which begins with the title track, based on a guitar riff reminiscent of the recent Deep Purple hit "Smoke on the Water," and continues through the lengthy "Roll Right Stones," the folkish ballad "Evening Blue," reed player Chris Wood's instrumental "Tragic Magic," and the uncertain self-help song "(Sometimes I Feel So) Uninspired." Lyricist Jim Capaldi was co-credited with Steve Winwood as the album's producer, and he may have contributed to the cleaner mix that made his words easier to understand. Meanwhile, the rhythm section had been replaced by Muscle Shoals studio aces David Hood and Roger Hawkins. Capaldi sings no songs here, and Wood's flute and saxophone, so often the flavoring of Traffic songs, are largely absent." - Allmusic Guide
    $5.00
  • Volto is a new (but long gestating) project from Tool drummer Danny Carey and Pigmy Love Circus guitarist John Ziegler.  The quartet is rounded out by noted keyboardist Jeff Babko and session bassist Lance Morrison.  The quartet have been together for some time playing cover tunes.  They finally decided to cut some original music.  To that end they recorded all analogue and had the album mastered by Bob Ludwig.  Expect great sound.This is a blazing all instrumental effort that fits squarely in the fusion genre but with strong overtones of progressive rock...and maybe just a touch of metal.  Chops from hell are the order of the day but this is highly melodic and never seems to suffer from "toomanynotes" syndrome.  At times Ziegler turns up the crunch factor to good effect and Babko lays down some wonderful solos.  Carey is Carey...awesome!!  Highly recommended.
    $14.00
  • "Reportedly released as an effort to undercut bootleggers following a world tour, Traffic: On the Road was the band's second live album in three years. The album chronicled a late edition of the band in which original members Steve Winwood, Jim Capaldi, and Chris Wood were augmented not only by percussionist Reebop Kwaku Baah, but also by a trio of session musicians from the famed Muscle Shoals studio, Roger Hawkins, David Hood, and Barry Beckett. The studio pros lent a tightness and proficiency to their characteristic free-form jams, and though they sometimes sounded like they couldn't wait to get the songs over with, the tunes went on and on, four clocking in at over ten minutes. That might have been okay if the choice of material had been more balanced across the band's career, but 1971's Welcome to the Canteen had treated earlier efforts, and the 1973 tour was promoting Shoot out at the Fantasy Factory, from which three of the six selections were drawn. Unfortunately, that album was not one of Traffic's best, and the live versions of its songs were no more impressive than the studio ones had been. Traffic: On the Road featured plenty of room for soloing by some good musicians, but it was the logical extreme of the band's forays into extended performance, with single tunes taking up entire sides on the original LPs. It's not surprising that, after this, Traffic shrunk in size and returned to shorter songs. " - Allmusic Guide
    $9.00
  • This was the first album with the revamped lineup of John McLaughlin, Jean Luc Ponty, Narada Michael Walden, Ralph Armstrong, and Gayle Moran. They didn't quite hit the heights the original lineup did but there are brilliant moments throughout.
    $7.00